Tag Archives: Using Panels

Northern Lights

The more you practice the better you get at something.  The same is true with quilting.  This quilt was supposed to be for my son Josh for Christmas (last Christmas).  Oh well, better late than never.  This panel is called Northern Lights by Abraham Hunter for Elizabeth’s Studio.  It claimed to be 36″ x 44″ but is was closer to 39″ wide.

I aligned my 6 panels, cut my hexagons and began designing around the panel.  I do not trim the panels before I align them.  Once they are aligned I can decide whether to use any of the borders or not.  I decided not to use the border in the blocks so when I guesstimated how much to trim off to even the edges , I included the borders.

I start by trying to get an idea of how many hexies will fit across the top and/or bottom of the panel. It is just like making a pieced border to fit around the center of a quilt. The width of the panel should be divisible by the finished size of my hexagon block.

You have two ways to make sure your hexagons will fit across the top and bottom of your panel. You can trim or add fabric to your panel and/or you can also adjust the size of your finished hexagon so it is divisible by the width of the panel.

Strip Width Yeilds Finished Hexie Size
3.75” 6.0”
3.50” 5.5
3.25” 5.0
3.00” 4.5
2.75” 4.0
2.50” 3.5
2.25” 3.0
2.0″ 2.5

I decided to cut my strips 3.75″ for 6″ finished hexagons and trim my panel to 36″ wide.  Six hexagons will fit across the bottom and/or top of the panel.

I kept playing with the design.

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Once I was satisfied with the design, I stitched the hexagons into four sections.

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I laid the top portion of hexies on the panel to help give me an accurate width to trim off.  I felt I would not lose an important part of the panel by cutting off the tree.

I trimmed the panel, Trimmed the portion of the hexies so it could be stitched to the panel.

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I discovered when the bottom set hexies were aligned with side hexies – I needed to add about 1 1/2″ of fabric.

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Now it all fit together wonderfully.  I just needed to hide the fabric I added and trim the top and bottom points.

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You can’t even tell where I added the fabric or hid it with smaller hexagons.  Next I will get quilted!

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No moose were hurt in the making of this quilt as Tucker was on duty supervising me the entire time.

Using Panels for a OBW V2

 

 

Plume – OBW #66

I am very goal oriented. Today is December 23rd and is One Block Wonder Day for me. Tomorrow I bake!

I used Plume for my example in my post “Using Panels in a One Block Wonder”. I also used it this fall in several OBW workshops. I wanted to get it finished so it wouldn’t get too beat up.

I also cut out two more OBW projects.

I’m going to use this panel in workshops to show how I integrate the blocks and the panel. It measures about 13″ x 20″ and will be much easier to work with in class than Plume. It is called Dreamscapes by Ira Kennedy for Northcott. I actually bought 14 panels, 7 panels for the class example and another 7 panels so I can finish one for me.

I also cut 6 of these spectacular panels that measure 34″ by 40″. I got 8 strips from these panels which yielded about 144 blocks. This is called Abraham Hunter for Elizabeth’s Studio’s.

Not a bad days work finishing Plume and cutting out two more OBW’s.

Of course I was supervised by Tucker, as always! Happy Holidays everyone!

Using Panels for a One Block Wonder

Have you seen some of the wonderfully creative One Block Wonders (OBW) made using precut panels?  If you haven’t you should join the Facebook group “One Block Wonder Quilt Forum”!  This is my third OBW using panels and I wanted to share how I put them together.

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My last OBW using panels “The Heron”, was so much fun I couldn’t wait to make the next one.  Start by purchasing 7 Panels.  One to be incorporated into the top and 6 to be aligned for making the hexagon blocks.

Plume Blocks

The process is same whether you are using yardage or panels.  The only difference is the repeats are already cut for you.  I don’t trim the panels, I just press them and layer them assuring they are all going in the direction.  Align them as directed in Maxine Rosenthal’s book One Block Wonders or One Block Wonder Encore.

Once the repeats/panels are aligned, trim one long edge so all the layers are ending in the same place.  This panel has a good size design, so I cut my strips 3 3/4″ wide by Width of Fabric (WOF).  Then using my ruler with a 60 degree line I cut my equilateral triangles and made my blocks.  Once the blocks are sorted by predominate color it is time to design.

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I know that when I cut my strips 3 3/4″ wide, my finished hexagon block will measure 6″ wide.  I squared up the panel and measured the width.  This panel after squaring up was 23″ wide.  This means 3 finished hexagon blocks would measure 18″ and 4 finished hexagon blocks would measure 24″ wide.  At this point I had two choices, trim the panel to 18″ wide or add fabric to make the panel 24″ wide.  I decided to add fabric that I will hide later.  You can decide to center your panel or offset it in any way.

I place the panel on my design wall and start the designing process.  I always place my blocks on the design wall so the opening is north and south.

I have established that I will need four  blocks wide across the top and the bottom.  How deep it goes depends on me.  I chose 4 blocks wide and 3 blocks deep on the top, and 4 blocks wide and 2 blocks deep on the bottom.

When placing the blocks on the side of the panel, every other block remains whole, while everything other is a half of a block.  I don’t remove the half until I’m sure the block will remain there, I just fold it in half.

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When I am satisfied with the design I number the rows as always and stitch the rows together in four groups: the top, bottom, right side & left side.  I think of this as a giant block that has a rectangle in the center and will be constructed using a partial seam.

Decide whether to attach the top or bottom first.  I am going to attach the top rows first by trimming the points that will be stitched to the panel, leaving a 1/4″ seam allowance.

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Once I have stitched the top rows to the panel I need to choose which side to attach next, matching up dog ears as you would when joining the rows and stitch three quarters of the way down (partial seam).

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By using a partial seam, it allows you to match up the dog ears of the bottom of the side rows.  I will them mark where the panel hits the bottom rows, add a 1/4″ seam allowance and stitch to the bottom and then finish the partial seam.

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It is now easy to stitch the remaining side rows to the panel matching the dog ears at the top and bottom.  I have not finished this top yet as I’m teaching several classes soon and wanted to have a good visual example to show the class.

Now to hide my added fabric.

I made sure I had several left over blocks.  I stitched the two halves together, pressed the seam open and using my ruler, trimmed 1″ off every side.  This reduces my hexagon to about 4″ wide.

I use a Fusible Knit Interfacing, cut a square slightly larger than the hexagon.  Place the bumpy side of the interfacing with the right side of the hexagon.  Stitch around the hexagon using a 1/4″ seam allowance.  Trim off the excess interfacing and snip a hole about 1″ wide.

Turn the hexagon right side out.  Now the fusible ‘bumpy side is on the outside.  Finger press the edges to flatten it out.  This is a great way to get a perfect finished edge.  Once I have decided where to place my smaller hexagons, I can use my iron and press them in place and finish them by stitching them down.

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See how well the small hexagons hide my added fabric?  I will post this OBW once I finished it.

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I was closely supervised while making this OBW by my quilting buddy Tucker!