Calm Seas

The fabrics featured in this post were given to me by Northcott Fabrics.

A Storm at Sea quilt has been on my “need to make list” for a long time.  I especially love the kind that use graduating colors.  Lucky for me, fellow Studio 180 Design Certified Instructor Michelle Hiatt created her pattern “Calm Seas“.  This fabulous pattern offers you a choice of 3 sizes; Throw, Double or King.  I chose to make the Throw size (62″ x 72”).  Calm Seas is a companion pattern for Studio 180 Design’s Large Square/Squared, Diamond Rects & V Block Tools.

I chose to use the fabulous fabrics from Northcott’s Canvas line.  I needed 12 graduating colors in 2 different values each.  Canvas is richly textured and has a depth of color that is gorgeous!  

Definitely use your best organizational skills when making this pattern.  Michelle has made it much easier for us to conquer a storm at sea.

If you know me…you know I use paper plates to keep myself organized.  I snipped a piece of each fabric and pasted it to the paper plate, writing down all pertinent info to keep my brains from falling out.

I was very fortunate to spend a few days at Bridle Creek Bed & Breakfast for an annual  mini quilt retreat with friends.  I managed to get all my diamond rects, large square/squared and small square/squared units done!

Following the pattern instructions, I laid out my units in the proper color order to achieve this beautiful flow.

I numbered my rows and pinned them together to begin stitching them together,

A little precision pinning goes a long way when it comes to nice crisp points.

After four days of hard work I finished the top.  Thanks to Michelle’s pattern Calm Seas & Deb Tucker’s Studio 180 Design tools I have checked another awesome quilt off my bucket list!

#northcottfabrics  #NorthcottCanvas #debtucker #studio180design

Whimsical and Wonky

Whimsical and Wonky

The Island Batik Ambassador’s December challenge was to create a project that is Whimsical & Wonky”.   Well, I settled on Tipsy!  My Holiday Tipsy Tree is based on BlockBuster pattern # 27 Roll the Dice .  This year I have made many quilt projects using Split Rects Units so it is only fitting I end the year with Split Rects.

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For this quilt I used Island Batik’s “Alpine Jungle” line of beautiful batiks.  I also used Studio 180 Design Split Rects, Square/Squared, Wing Clipper I & Lemoyne Star tools.  I chose four different green fabrics, 9 for block centers.

Cut your elongated triangles according to the Split Rects tool instructions.

Cut your background side triangles the same way.

Lay out your split rects, align and center the two pieces with just a bit of overlap at the ends. Stitch and press seams open.  I love using my “Stick Strip” for pressing seams open.

Following the tool instructions trim, rotate & trim again.

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Make the 9 Square/Squared units following the Square Squared tool instructions.  I chose 9 different unit centers but you could make them all one color if you like.  Each side of the square/squared unit will be different to match the fabric used for the split rects units.

Lay out your units as they will be stitched.  Choose a square/squared unit for the center, rotating the square/squared unit so the side triangle matches the same fabric used in the split rects unit.

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This block is constructed using a partial seam.  Place the square/squared unit right sides together with one of the split rects units being sure to match the fabrics and stitch half way down the square/squared unit.

This gives you the next complete edge to stitch another split rects to, again matching the square/squared unit fabric with the split rects fabric.

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When stitching the split rects to the square/squared unit, always place the precision cut square/squared unit on top be careful to stitch using the unit center as a guide.

Continue stitching the split rects units and complete the partial seam, pressing toward the split rects units.  Make the other 8 blocks the same way.

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Tree Trunk:  Make one set of 2″ x 4″ finished flying geese using the Wing Clipper I tool instructions.  Only 3 flying geese units will be needed.

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Tree Star:  Make the 6″ finished lemoyne star using the Lemoyne Star tool instructions.

Lay out your quilt blocks and construct the quilt center.  Once the borders are added the finished quilt measures 38″ x 38″.

Happy Holidays!

#islandbatik #thebestofbali #islandbatikambassador #alpinejungle #iloveislandbatik #debtucker #studio180design #whimsicalandwonky

OBW #65 Paisley Cats

I just finished my 65th One Block Wonder “Paisley Cats” by Quilting Treasures.  It measures 77″ x 82″.

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I feel this fabric design was borderline acceptable size for 3.75″ strips.

The original fabric design is not that big…..but

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If the print was larger the overall design would have been more dramatic. But the individual blocks are just beautiful. 

This is a gift I finished just in time!

My Evening Elegance Revealed

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Evening Elegance measures 60″ x 60″.  The blocks are finished at 12″.

This is one version of Deb Tucker’s Evening Elegance quilt.  Go to Deb Tucker’s blog  to see version 1 and to download both quilt settings.  It was designed using BlockBuster Patterns:   1 Ohio Star, 7 Whimsy Turndash, 9 Three in One, 16 Peaks & Valleys, 20 Stellar Collision, 21 Around the Block, 22 Square Dance, 26 Cactus Blossom and  34 Evening Shadow.

I really had fun making this quilt.  I love the “Circle of Nine” layout.

These beautiful fabrics from Island Batik are gorgeous.

#islandbatik #thebestfrombali  #debtucker #studio180design #twilightchic #Blockbusters

Evening Elegance Blog Hop

This is day 3 of Studio 180 Design’s Evening Elegance Blog Hop.  Deb Tucker has launched her own fabulous signature fabric collection, Twilight Chic, with Island Batik and fabric designer Kathy Engle.

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Below are the links to everyone participating in the blog hop:

Monday November 5th – Karen Overton – The Quilt Rambler” https://thequiltrambler.com/blog/

Tuesday November 6th – Tammy Silvers – Tamarinis – http://www.tamarinis.typepad.com/

Wednesday November 7th – Jackie OBrien – If These Threads Could Talk – https://ifthesethreadscouldtalk.com/blog-posts/

Thursday November 8th – Tina Dillard – Quilting Affection Designs – http://quiltingaffection.blogspot.com/

Friday November 9th – Studio 180 Design – https://deb-tuckers-studio-180-design.myshopify.com/blogs/news

Check back on Friday to see one version of the  Evening Elegance quilt completed.  The quilt was designed using BlockBuster Patterns:   1 Ohio Star, 7 Whimsy Turndash, 9 Three in One, 16 Peaks & Valleys, 20 Stellar Collision, 21 Around the Block, 22 Square Dance, 26 Cactus Blossom and  34 Evening Shadow.

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I was assigned BlockBuster 9 – Three in One, using the V Block and Tucker Trimmer I tools.

Unit A. V Blocks:  Make 4 V Blocks.

Unit C. Quarter Square Triangle:  Make a Quarter Square Triangle with the fabrics that match the V Blocks, remember to swirl the center.

Unit B. Combination Units:  Combination units begin by making half squares triangles (HSTs). The fabric for the HSTs must match the side triangles in the v blocks, so I began by laying out the starter squares next to the V Blocks and then making them into the combination units.

When making Combination units, you are making two at a time, a left & a right.  Choose the units that will match the side triangles in the V Blocks as shown above.

Sew the units into rows then join the rows into the block.

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My second BlockBuster was 16 Peaks & Valleys using the Diamonds Rects Tool and V Block Tool & the  Sidekick, High Low Technique Sheet.

Unit A. Diamond Rects:  Cut your precision diamonds & side triangles per the Diamonds Rects instructions.  Stitch opposite side triangles, press toward the side triangles.  Stitch the other opposites side triangles.

Make 4 diamond rects units and trim.

Stitch using a partial seam to the center square.  Stitch the second diamond rects unit and so on to finish the block center.

Unit B. High Low Left:  Following the instruction the in technique sheet cut your squares and trim, add the replacement side triangle.  Mark and stitch the square for the low point and trim.

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Make four High Low Left Units.

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Unit C Sidekick Right:  When making a Sidekick Right, position fabrics face down for cutting.  Cut and stitch replacement side triangles.

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Peaks & Valleys block unit layout.

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Stitch units into rows.

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Join the rows to complete the block.

I love the Twilight Chic fabrics from Island Batik and I can’t wait to show you one of the finished quilts!

#islandbatik #debtucker #twilightchic #studio180design #blockbusters

Log Cabin Challenge

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The Island Batik challenge for November is to incorporate a log cabin block or variation into my project.  I decided to use Studio 180 Design’s Geese on the Edge Technique Sheet.  This is a variation on the Log Cabin block and is a fun way to use your Square/Squared tool, Tucker Trimmer I & Wing Clipper I.

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My beautiful Island Batik fabrics from left to right:  Mr. T Blocks: Arc Pine Needle, Dash-Grasshopper, Seed Circle Custard, Arc Waves Grasshopper, & Sprinkles Playful Pachyderm, & Paisley Dot: Apricot, Candy Corn, Nasturtium, & Item number 121412189.

I have named my original design “Converging Geese” because each block has Flying Geese & Geese on the Edge units, along with Square/Squared units.

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Each 16″ block contains 12 – 2″ x 4″ finished flying geese, 4 – 6″ finished geese on the edge & 1 square/squared unit.  These Geese on the Edge units are soooo much fun to make!  The technique sheet gives instruction for making geese on the edge in 10 sizes from 3″ to 12″!

You begin with starter squares, add logs by chain stitching, square up two sides with your Tucker Trimmer.

Trim apart.

Using your Wing Clipper trim the corner leaving a 1/4″ seam allowance.

Add a replacement triangle and press toward the triangle.

Trim after every addition of a replacement triangle.  Add more logs.

The final trim down is performed when I have four rounds of logs for a  6″ finished geese on the edge unit.

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Stitch the flying geese units into sets containing 3 each.

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Block layout.

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I have created a down loadable pattern for Converging Geese (measures 60″ x 60″) that can be purchased on my If Threads Could Talk Etsy Shop.

#islandbatik #bestofbali #studio180design #debtucker #geeseontheedge

Using Panels for a One Block Wonder

Have you seen some of the wonderfully creative One Block Wonders (OBW) made using precut panels?  If you haven’t you should join the Facebook group “One Block Wonder Quilt Forum”!  This is my third OBW using panels and I wanted to share how I put them together.

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My last OBW using panels “The Heron”, was so much fun I couldn’t wait to make the next one.  Start by purchasing 7 Panels.  One to be incorporated into the top and 6 to be aligned for making the hexagon blocks.

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The process is same whether you are using yardage or panels.  The only difference is the repeats are already cut for you.  I don’t trim the panels, I just press them and layer them assuring they are all going in the direction.  Align them as directed in Maxine Rosenthal’s book One Block Wonders or One Block Wonder Encore.

Once the repeats/panels are aligned, trim one long edge so all the layers are ending in the same place.  This panel has a good size design, so I cut my strips 3 3/4″ wide by Width of Fabric (WOF).  Then using my ruler with a 60 degree line I cut my equilateral triangles and made my blocks.  Once the blocks are sorted by predominate color it is time to design.

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I know that when I cut my strips 3 3/4″ wide, my finished hexagon block will measure 6″ wide.  I squared up the panel and measured the width.  This panel after squaring up was 23″ wide.  This means 3 finished hexagon blocks would measure 18″ and 4 finished hexagon blocks would measure 24″ wide.  At this point I had two choices, trim the panel to 18″ wide or add fabric to make the panel 24″ wide.  I decided to add fabric that I will hide later.  You can decide to center your panel or offset it in any way.

I place the panel on my design wall and start the designing process.  I always place my blocks on the design wall so the opening is north and south.

I have established that I will need four  blocks wide across the top and the bottom.  How deep it goes depends on me.  I chose 4 blocks wide and 3 blocks deep on the top, and 4 blocks wide and 2 blocks deep on the bottom.

When placing the blocks on the side of the panel, every other block remains whole, while everything other is a half of a block.  I don’t remove the half until I’m sure the block will remain there, I just fold it in half.

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When I am satisfied with the design I number the rows as always and stitch the rows together in four groups: the top, bottom, right side & left side.  I think of this as a giant block that has a rectangle in the center and will be constructed using a partial seam.

Decide whether to attach the top or bottom first.  I am going to attach the top rows first by trimming the points that will be stitched to the panel, leaving a 1/4″ seam allowance.

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Once I have stitched the top rows to the panel I need to choose which side to attach next, matching up dog ears as you would when joining the rows and stitch three quarters of the way down (partial seam).

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By using a partial seam, it allows you to match up the dog ears of the bottom of the side rows.  I will them mark where the panel hits the bottom rows, add a 1/4″ seam allowance and stitch to the bottom and then finish the partial seam.

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It is now easy to stitch the remaining side rows to the panel matching the dog ears at the top and bottom.  I have not finished this top yet as I’m teaching several classes soon and wanted to have a good visual example to show the class.

Now to hide my added fabric.

I made sure I had several left over blocks.  I stitched the two halves together, pressed the seam open and using my ruler, trimmed 1″ off every side.  This reduces my hexagon to about 4″ wide.

I use a Fusible Knit Interfacing, cut a square slightly larger than the hexagon.  Place the bumpy side of the interfacing with the right side of the hexagon.  Stitch around the hexagon using a 1/4″ seam allowance.  Trim off the excess interfacing and snip a hole about 1″ wide.

Turn the hexagon right side out.  Now the fusible ‘bumpy side is on the outside.  Finger press the edges to flatten it out.  This is a great way to get a perfect finished edge.  Once I have decided where to place my smaller hexagons, I can use my iron and press them in place and finish them by stitching them down.

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See how well the small hexagons hide my added fabric?  I will post this OBW once I finished it.

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I was closely supervised while making this OBW by my quilting buddy Tucker!