Category Archives: Using Panels for a OBW

Celestial Journey – OBW # 88

I love Josephine Wall’s art, her fabric panels are glorious. They make spectacular One Block Wonders.

Celestial Journey panel measures 35″ x 43″

These panels must have been either the beginning of the run or the last. The outer edges were off be about 1/2″. I focused on aligning the panels around the unicorn. The outer edges were mostly space so it was not crucial they be perfectly aligned. I cut my strips 3.75″ by WOF.

Celestial Journey, 76″ x 100″

I wanted to give my travelers a destination. I created a nearby galaxy for them consisting of stars created using my Star 60 Tool and 5 technique sheets: Quad 60, Framed 60, Striped 60, Checkerboard 60, Capped 60.

#studio180design #Star60 #Quad60 #Framed60, #Striped60 #Checkerboard60 #Capped60 #QuiltersDreamBatting #Bernina740

DreamScapes – OBW #87 & Quad 60

I have had this panel by Artisan Spirit Dreamscapes by Ira Kennedy for Northcott for several years. The Dreamscapes panel measures 13″ x 20″. It came two in a panel, so I ended up with 14.

I partially completed the first set of 7 panels to show how to add the sections to the panel. I save this OBW classes.

I finally decided to complete the 2nd set of panels. I cut the strips 2 3/4″ for 4″ finished hexies. In hind site I wish I would have made them smaller. To add more hexies and enhance the hexies I had, I added stars made with the Quad 60 Technique Sheet and my Star 60 Tool. My Dreamscapes wall hanging measures 35″ x 41″

#studio180design #DebTucker #Star60 #Quad60 #Northcottfabrics #Quiltersdreambatting #Irakennedy

Spirit of Flight – OBW #86

One day, several months ago I received a text from my sister Marti in Arizona. She frantically wanted to know how panels were needed for a One Block Wonder (OBW). I quickly answered “7” panels were needed. I thought she must have a found a fabulous panel to work with. Then about a week later I a received a package from Marti.

Spirit of Flight by Josephine Wall

Marti had sent me 7 panels by Josephine Wall & 3 Wishes. I was obsessed and couldn’t wait to make this panel into a OBW. Marti said this would be me when I emerged from breast cancer treatment. She was right!

Spirit of Flight measures 97″ x 71″

As I was working on this OBW I realized that most of the hexagons would be toward the back. I made these great stars using Studio 180 Design Star 60 Tool and the Framed 60 Technique Sheet to enhance my design. Now she is shooting for the stars and leaving cancer behind!

#studio180design #star60 #framed60 #3wishesfabric #josephinewall #Bernia #Nolting #Quiltersdreambatting

Rainbow Kitty OBW #82 & the Star 60 Tool

The official name for this quilt is Samantha’s Rainbow Kitty. This quilt was made with love for my Granddaughter Sam. It was supposed to be finished for Christmas but it is in time for my special Valentine.

Panel by Chong-A-Hwang for Timeless Treasures

Why did I choose 5.5″ Finished Hexagons?

This panel measured 23 inches wide. I chose 5.5″ (Cut my strips 3.5″) finished hexies because 4 X 5.5 = 22″. Now I only have trim 1/2″ from both sides and my hexies will fit along the bottom and the top of the panel.

Checkerboard 60

I wanted to add a large star to my design. Using my Star 60 Tool and Checkerboard 60 Technique Sheet I was able to make a great star.

I began by deciding on what size to make my star. I wanted it twice as big as my 5.5″ finished hexies, hmmm, that means an 11″ finished star. The Checkerboard Technique sheet makes beautiful stars in 17 sizes from 2″ up to 18″ in 1″ increments. I needed to make 5.5″ Finished units. I followed technique sheet instructions for a 6″ Finished Units and will trim them so they would finish at 5.5″ units.

Step 1 – Make two strip sets.

Step 2 – Layer the strips sets one on top of the other right sides down. Using the Star 60 tool and a regular ruler establish the 60 degree angle.

From the first cut, cut additional angled sections the same width as the as the cut size of the diamond strips.

Step 3 – Pair each “A” section with a “B” section. Make sure the inner and outer diamonds are oriented correctly. The pink diamonds will be the inner part of my star. The outer diamonds are yellow.

Mark 1/4″ seam allowance using the Magic Wand.

On the edges you will be stitching together, mark the 1/4″ seam allowance across the seams on the wrong side.

Pin section A & B

Stitch your section “A” with Section “B” units.

Press the seams open.

Step 4 – Trim the outer diamond using the Star 60 tool. I trimmed using the Outer Diamond Trim Guidelines for a 5″ finished unit.

First cut.

Continue cutting side triangles.

Step 5 – Add the side triangles.

Layout the right side triangles.

Position the side triangle on top of the diamond, matching the flat corner to the edge of the diamond.

Stitch with the diamond on top.

Press toward the diamond. (Whatever you are pressing toward, goes on top.)

Layout the left side triangle.

Position the the remaining side triangle on the other side of the diamond point. Align the flat corner of the triangle with the edge of the diamond, aligning the raw edges as before.

After it is stitched, but before you press, trim the unit as shown above to remove bulk.

Press toward the side triangle.

Step 6 – Trim the pieced Star 60 unit suing the Star 60 tool. I trimmed using the 5″ finished unit guidelines.

Step 7 – Describes the trimming the final edge. I did not complete this trim. Remember, I need an 11″ finished star, which means I need 5.5″ finished units. I accomplished this by trimming the diamonds per the 5″ guidelines. I created an 11″ finished star by NOT trimming the outer edges of the star.

Layout your diamond units.

Stitch your diamond units together creating two halves.

Making Star 60’s – To make 5.5″ finished Stars, I am following the cutting instructions for 3″ Finished Units. Remember, the chart refers to UNITS not to Finished Stars! To use the chart, first determine the desired finished size of your unit, then follow the row across for the strip size for the shape you want to cut.

Cutting the Diamonds – I followed the cutting instructions for 3″ finished units. Trim one short edge at a 60 degree angle as shown above. Locate the Diamond Sub-Cut Guideline in the chart which for 3″ finished units is 4″. Align those guidelines with the raw edges of the strip and the angled cut just made as shown in the diagram. Cut along the leading edge of the tool to create oversized diamond shapes.

Cut your side triangles. For 3″ finished units the side triangle strips are 2 1/2″.

Layout the right side triangle.

Position the side triangle on top of the diamond, matching the flat corner to the edge of the diamond.

Stitch with the diamond on top.

Press toward the Diamond. Layout the remaining side triangle.

Position the the remaining side triangle on the other side of the diamond point. Align the flat corner of the triangle with the edge of the diamond, aligning the raw edges as before.

Trim the bulk as shown above.

Press toward the side triangle.

I followed the cutting instructions for 3″ finished units, BUT I’m making 5.5″ finished stars, so I’m trimming the Diamond Point using the 2 1/2″ guidelines. I do not trim the outer edges of the unit to obtain a 5.5″ finished star.

Star 60 Units

Stitch units into two halves.

Designing With the Hexagons

The final layout

After I numbered my rows, I stitched the four rows above the checkerboard star into two rows, and the same with the four rows under the checkerboard star as shown in photo 1. Photo 2 shows stitching the top and bottom row to the checkerboard star halves. Photo 3 shows the two rows joined together.

Continue to stitch rows into 4 sections, Left, Right, Top & Bottom.

I placed the bottom section right sides together to verify how much I need to trim off the sides of the panel so it will be the same width as the top and bottom hexies. In this case I trimmed 1/2″ off both sides.

You can choose to attach either the top or bottom hexies first. I chose the bottom because I wanted to control where the hexies attached to the bottom of the panel. After the hexies are laid out and stitched together we loose 1/4″ between them. I felt I could safely loose a couple of inches off the top of the panel without affecting the design. But I did not want to loose inches off the panel bottom.

I pressed the bottom hexies under 1/4″ and top stitched them to the panel.

Match up the hexies/dog ears of the left side with hexies/dog ears on the bottom. Stitch leaving about 12″ from the top of the panel.

Place the panel and partially stitched left side on a table and place the top hexies on top of the panel matching up the dog ears to establish where the top hexies will be stitched to the panel.

Pin top to the panel being sure the dog ears match up to the left side hexies.

Top Stitch the top hexies to the panel. Finish stitching the left side to the panel and top hexies.

Match up the dog ears of the right side and stitch.

Samantha’s Rainbow Kitty, measures 75″ X 70″. I will quilt it as soon as the backing arrives.

The Road to OZ – OBW #78

I love the Wizard of Oz! I know it is a very controversial movie, either you love it or hate it! In 2008 Quilting Treasures came out with the Wizard of Oz fabric line. The first fabrics were in sepia tones. I have made many, many Wizard of Oz quilts from my extensive Wizard of Oz fabric stash. This Road to Oz is for me!

I used Studio 180 Design’s Star 60 Tool to enhance my One Block Wonder. Aside from cutting the equilateral triangles I will share how to cut Whole Hexagons, Half Hexagons and make a Half Hexie Braid for borders with the Star 60 tool.

This fabric by Quilting Treasures came out in 2009 and has a 23″ repeat. I’ve decided to use it as a panel on the quilt top. The width is a little over 43″. I need to determine what size finished hexie will fit evenly across the bottom & top of the panel. If I cut my strips 3 3/4″ wide they will produce 6″ finished hexies. If I trim my panel to 42″, I can fit 7 – 6″ finished hexies across the bottom and top of the panel. Note: I NEVER trim the panel until I have my hexies designed and verify they fit the way I want them to.

Strips are cut.

I used my Star 60 Tool from Studio Design to cut my equilateral triangles. Be sure the tool point just touches the cut edge of the strips. we want dogears to help lining up blocks and rows.

TIP: You know those pieces you have left at the of the strips that are too small for a full size hexie? One side is already cut at a 60 degree angle, if you place the tool edge on the straight side of the pieces, adjusting the edge of the tool to not include the selvedge and cut, you will have small hexie that can be appliqued onto your top.

My triangles are cut, stitched and sorted by predominate color.

Placing the panel on the design wall takes some thought and planning. My design wall consists of 4 closet doors 24″ wide, that are covered with flannel over insulation, so I have plenty of room. My goal was to create a path that would connect the yellow brick road on the right side with the yellow brick road on the top of the panel. I placed the panel so there would be more room on the right side and the top of the panel.

Remember, I can fit 7 – 6″ finished hexies across the bottom of the panel. The hexies are not finished yet, so they don’t fit well. They extend further than the panel. Keep this in mind to keep track of where your rows are so you don’t get confused. If 7 finished hexies will fit across the bottom, that means 14 half hexies will establish the width of the bottom section and the top section. I started at the bottom of the panel and then worked my way up the sides. You may start at either the top or the Bottom, it doesn’t matter.

First attempt at my design was close, but I didn’t feel the yellow hexies I had were creating a vibrant connecting path. I tried again surrounding my path with darker hexies & decided to create some Star 60 Units instead.

Cutting the Diamonds: To create a Star 60 Unit that contains a diamond with side triangles that would create a 6″ finished hexie I went to the Basic Shape Cutting Chart in the Star 60 instructions. I followed the cutting instructions for 2 1/2″ finished units. For my diamonds, I cut a 2″ WOF strip. Trim the first edge at a 60 degree angle as shown above. Locate the Diamond Sub-cut Guideline in the next column for 2 1/2″ finished unit which is 3 1/2″. Align those guidelines with the raw edges of the strip and the angled cut just made as shown above. Each hexie will need 6 diamonds.

Cutting the Side Triangles.: Checking the chart for Side Triangle Strip size, I cut my 2 1/4″ WOF strips. Align the mark near the top of the tool with the top of the strip and the horizontal line on the tool that corresponds to the width if the strip (2 1/4″). Cut the side triangles then rotate the tool and cut again. Each diamond will need two side triangles. Follow the Star 60 tool instructions for Piecing the side triangles to the diamond.

Trimming Star 60 Units: We will be trimming the flat end of the unit only! Align the Flat Edge trim lines with the seams of the diamond. For lefty’s, rotate the unit so the flat side is on left side. Six of these trimmed Star 60 units are the same size as a stack of 6 equilateral triangles cut from a 3 3/4″ strip. These Star 60 units can be made in 17 sizes.

I loved the way the Star 60 units created a vibrant path to connect to the Yellow Brick Road. You notice a very light block near center of the top. That is Glinda the Good Witch. She wasn’t on the panel but I had to add her!

Cutting Whole Hexagons: I wanted a block that contained the Emerald City. I forgot to take a picture while I cut it, so the instructions below use a different fabric.

The Hexagon Cutting Chart allows you to cut whole hexagons in 15 sizes. For a 6″ finished (6 1/2″ Unfinished) hexie, cut a strip 6 1/2″ wide. Fold the strip in half. Our Horizontal Guideline Placement is 6 1/4″. Place the 6 1/4″ line on the fold and cut both sides. You now have a 6 1/2″ unfinished whole hexagon.

Once I was happy with the block placement, I number my rows across the top and under the bottom section. I stitched the rows into four sections, left, right, top & bottom..

I decided to add the bottom section to panel first. I didn’t want to leave the points because they would cover up Toto, and I couldn’t have that, so I trimmed the top points only. I don’t trim the outside edges until the top is all stitched together.

Adding the bottom section allows me to line up and match the dogears of the rows on the right side.

Lining up the dogears

Pin and stitch the right side rows to the center section using a partial seam. I left a good 8 inches open to leave room for adjusting placement of the top section.

I decided to applique the top section to the panel by leaving the points on the bottom of the top section. I took stitches out about 1/4″ down between the valley of the blocks and pressed the edges under 1/4″.

Lay out the center and the partially stitched right side rows. Lay the top section next to right side rows, matching up the dogears. This will show you how far down the top section will overlap onto the panel.

Pin it well, assuring it is straight and top stitch the center to the panel. Now I’m able to finish the partial seam for the right side.

Adding the left is very easy now. Just match up the dogears and stitch together.

Once the rows are all joined, I trim the points off the top and the bottom of the quilt top. I added a border to the top. I’m thinking about adding a small black border.

Above is a closeup of the showing Glinda & the Emerald City whole Hexie. One more technique I wanted to share is making Half Hexagons. The Star 60 tool instructions have a chart for cutting Half Hexagons in 8 sizes. I thought about making a Half Hexie Braid for a border but my top was too busy.

Half Hexies Braid: I followed the cutting instructions for 1 1/2″ finished half hexies. I cut 3 different 2 1/4″ strips. In the chart locate the “Bottom Horizontal Line” for 1 1/2″ finished half hexie, which is the 4″ line. Place it on the bottom of the strip and cut both sides. Rotate the tool placing the 4″ line on the top and aligning the edge just cut.

Above, I laid out my half hexies alternating the 3 colors.

Pick up the first two right sides together, nudging the top half hexie 1/4″ from the point and stitch together. Press toward the first half hexie.

Add a third half hexie by centering it over the two stitched hexies.

Keep adding half hexies until you have the length you want. After the first two half hexies are stitched and pressed, the remaining half hexies are pressed toward the unit just added. I think this a cool inner or outer border that I will be using on another quilt.

Above are “Inside the Twister” and “Yellow Brick Road with a Twist”.

Ruca the Technicolor Cat – OBW #77

Last January I had the great joy of meeting my half sister Marti for the first time. I also acquired many new family members.

When I saw this panel by Chong-A Hwang for Timeless Treasures, I knew I had to make a One Block Wonder for my Great Niece Alexa. Alexa has a wonderful cat named “Ruca”, whom she has had since she was in college. I met Ruca, a very special cat.

Even though this panel states it measures 24″ by 44″, by the time I cut apart the panels and squared it up, it was more like 23 1/2″ wide. For my finished hexies to fit evenly across the bottom of the panel I would have to make some adjustments. If I cut my strips 3 3/4″ wide, my finished hexies would be 6″ wide, which is not evenly divisible by 23 1/2″. I could just add fabric to the panel to bring it up to 24″ wide and then hide the extra fabric with appliqued hexagons as I have done before.

But I decided to trim the panel to fit the bottom rows of hexagons instead. If I cut my strips 3 1/2″, my finished hexies would be 5 1/2″ wide which would be evenly divisible into 22″. I don’t trim the panel until I’m ready to add the hexies. You can see that four finished hexagons (or 8 half hexies) will fit across the bottom of the panel. Here are my tips for Using Panels for a OBW:

Ruca the Technicolor Cat, OBW #77 measures 62″ X 62″

I am so pleased with how this OBW came out. It was wonderful meeting you Alexa, thank you for your hospitality.

The Tree – OBW #69

You may have realized I love history and cemeteries. As my sister and I were visiting family in Forest Hills Cemetery (Utica, NY) we were drawn to this tree.

When I saw this panel I couldn’t believe my eyes. I have been taking photo’s of this tree since 2010. It is very near the grave of John Adams Great Granddaughter Mary Louisa Adams. Johnson and not far from our family. I love trees, I think I was a Druid in another life! Needless to say I just had to make a One Block Wonder using this panel from Quilting Treasures.

First attempt at designing.

When I stitched the rows together, I discovered I needed to add some fabric so the hexies would line up as I wanted them to. Then I had to disguise the added fabric and soften the edges.

I’m pretty happy with it. Below is a downloadable description of how I design a OBW with panels.

Size Matters

At least when it comes to One Block Wonders (OBW) it does. There are so many “Size” questions when it comes to choosing our fabrics. What size repeat should I choose? What size panel? What size strip width should I cut? What size design elements. The first thing I do when choosing OBW fabric is check the size of the repeat. Then I decide what size to cut the strips based on the size of the design elements. If I want to cut my strips 3 3/4″ wide then I want the design in the fabric to be larger than 4″ or I will not be taking the fabric apart.

I was going through my OBW stash and this found fabric I had started to cut up. I don’t know how long I’ve had it. It was The Saturday Evening Post line by Quilting Treasures. I had 4 yards of this striped pattern and another 4 yards of a different layout. I separated the strips and then found the repeat which was 8″ x 23″. I decided it was large enough to align the repeats and cut into 3 3/4″ strips. I could have cut the strips narrower for small blocks but I decided the design elements were large enough for 3 3/4″ strips which make 6″ finished hexagons. I used the ripping method to separate the strips to be sure they were straight. I have to say I don’t like this method. It made the edges wavy and was rough on the fabric. It may have easier to rip but next time I will use ruler rotary cutter,

It is not quilted yet but I do like the design. I used strips from the original fabric for the inner border. The outer border is from fabric number 2. It was also a striped with these small 5″ squares and larger 10″ squares below:

I have eight 10″ blocks of each, that leaves 6 panels for the blocks and 1 for the top with one leftover. Repeats can be from yardage or 6 panels can be used for our hexagon blocks. If I cut the strips 2 3/4″ I will get 3 strips will a little wiggle room left over. If I cut the strips 2 1/2″ wide I will get 4 strips with very little margin for error.

I made this 12″ block from hexagons cut from 1 1/2″ strips.

The photo of the tree is from Forest Hills Cemetery in Utica, NY. It is just above the grave of Mary Louisa Johnson, Daughter of John Adams, granddaughter of John Quincy Adams (6th President of the United States) & Great Granddaughter of John Adams 2nd President of the United States. The panel was 36″ 44″. It was so large it took 12 flowers pins to align it instead of the usual 6. I can’t wait to design it.

I spent last weekend cutting these panels into equilateral triangles. Now I’m ready to stitch away to my hearts content.

Northern Lights

The more you practice the better you get at something.  The same is true with quilting.  This quilt was supposed to be for my son Josh for Christmas (last Christmas).  Oh well, better late than never.  This panel is called Northern Lights by Abraham Hunter for Elizabeth’s Studio.  It claimed to be 36″ x 44″ but is was closer to 39″ wide.

I aligned my 6 panels, cut my hexagons and began designing around the panel.  I do not trim the panels before I align them.  Once they are aligned I can decide whether to use any of the borders or not.  I decided not to use the border in the blocks so when I guesstimated how much to trim off to even the edges , I included the borders.

I start by trying to get an idea of how many hexies will fit across the top and/or bottom of the panel. It is just like making a pieced border to fit around the center of a quilt. The width of the panel should be divisible by the finished size of my hexagon block.

You have two ways to make sure your hexagons will fit across the top and bottom of your panel. You can trim or add fabric to your panel and/or you can also adjust the size of your finished hexagon so it is divisible by the width of the panel.

Strip Width YeildsFinished Hexie Size
3.75”6.0”
3.50”5.5
3.25”5.0
3.00”4.5
2.75”4.0
2.50”3.5
2.25”3.0
2.0″2.5

I decided to cut my strips 3.75″ for 6″ finished hexagons and trim my panel to 36″ wide.  Six hexagons will fit across the bottom and/or top of the panel.

I kept playing with the design.

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Once I was satisfied with the design, I stitched the hexagons into four sections.

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I laid the top portion of hexies on the panel to help give me an accurate width to trim off.  I felt I would not lose an important part of the panel by cutting off the tree.

I trimmed the panel, Trimmed the portion of the hexies so it could be stitched to the panel.

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I discovered when the bottom set hexies were aligned with side hexies – I needed to add about 1 1/2″ of fabric.

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Now it all fit together wonderfully.  I just needed to hide the fabric I added and trim the top and bottom points.

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You can’t even tell where I added the fabric or hid it with smaller hexagons.  Next I will get quilted!

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No moose were hurt in the making of this quilt as Tucker was on duty supervising me the entire time.

OBW Fabulousity

Wowza, I just got home from teaching a One Block Wonder workshop to a great group of quilters whom I think of as friends!  We gathered at the Strong House Inn in Vergennes, Vermont, where Innkeepers Mary, Hugh & Betsy spoil us with care.

 

We hit the road running on Thursday afternoon, almost as soon as I got in the room the cutting of the repeats began.

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Carol had started hers hexies at home so she designed first, and what an awesome job she did!

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I did not get a picture of Sally’s original fabric.  It was motorcycles, racing flags and flowers on a bright clear blue fabric.  Her design is so very cool.  Ride Sally Ride!

 

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Joan’s panel is in deep golds and rich colors.  It seems one of her favorite blocks was very plain that she called “the Tortilla”!  Can you find it?

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Joan’s sister Sharon had a small aboriginal print from an 8″ repeat that she cut 2 1/2″ strips for a smaller hexie.  Somehow I missed getting a picture of her final design which was totally awesome.

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Deb’s panel is awesome and her hexie design is totally awesomeness!

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Gladys’ fabric is so bright and cheerful.  Her design is a true celebration of color!

 

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Our very own Kathy Gannon had a fabulous large aboriginal fabric. The light in this photo does not shown how wonderful this design is.  Kathy took the darker greens and fashioned a caterpillar crawling across the design.  She also made great use of her left over fabric by making several size hexies to add a unique creative flair to her quilt.  I can’t wait to see it finished.

 

Wonderful Jane found her fabric strips needed to be cut smaller to make best use of the design.  She thought she would never get to the end of sewing her Mardi Gras hexies together.

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Martha started with a great panel and came up with a very creative design.  She loving calls some of her blocks “desert plates” that surround the center of light hexies.

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Anne was not too sure about a One Block Wonder Retreat, but she went along with her sister Martha’s choice.  What a completely awesome job she did.  She is calling this quilt “Moon over Kyoto”!

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Me at the end of the day laying in my bed exhausted!

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What a great group of quilting friends.  I miss you guys already!

I hope you ladies will share your completed quilts on our Vergennes OBW Class 2019.

And don’t forget to join the One Block Wonder Quilt Forum for inspiration.

I’ll be back at the Strong House Inn October 24, 25, 26 & 27, 2019 for “Everything You Wanted to Know about the Tucker Trimmer, But were afraid to Ask” workshop.  We will make at least 4 blocks showcasing what units you can make, a table runner and a wall hanging, so make your reservations soon!  Happy Quilting everyone.