Tag Archives: quilting

Sensational Squares with the Square/Squared Tool

I just finished quilting “Lion Eyes” Octagonal One Block Wonder. I had 18 Sensational Squares sets left over.

Remember, Sensational Squares are the triangles that fill the space between the octagons.

I wanted to add the left over Sensational Squares to the borders of the quilt.

I made my Sensational Squares into Square/Squared units using my Studio 180 Design Square/Squared tool.

There are 3 parts to this tool.

The Center Square Section, which gives you a series of squares that are precisely drafted so that their diagonal measurement is exactly the finished size of the Square²™ unit.

The Trim Down Section gives you guide lines to align with the seams of the pieced Square²™ unit so you can trim each to a precise size with a proper ¼” seam allowance on all sides.

The Size Chart for Triangles gives the recommended size squares to cut that when cut in half diagonally will yield two slightly oversized triangles for constructing the unit.

Note: The fabric in the photo is different from the Lion Eyes.

Per my Wedge Star Instructions I had cut my Large Wedges from 4″ strips and my Corner Squares from 3″ strips (you must have at least 4 aligned repeats). Cut 3″ square sets.

Cut your square sets once diagonally.

Each stack of 4 half square triangles will give you one 4 Patch Posie.

Stitch 2 triangles together and press the seams the same way on both halves.

The seams will nest when stitching the halves together.

Swirl the seams and press.

Use your Square²™ ruler to precision cut your center squares from your 4 Patch Posie. I lined up the diagonal line on the tool with the diagonal seam centering the lines for a 4″ finished square making sure I had fabric to trim on all 4 sides. Trim up the side and across the top. Rotate the unit lining up the just trimmed sides with the size lines and the diagonal line with the diagonal seam and trim up the side and across the top. The Square²™ unit looks great with a fussy cut square in the center or simply cut chosen fabric as usual. Just remember that this square will be diagonal in the pieced unit.

The 4 Patch Posie is now trimmed and ready for oversized triangles.

Check the chart on the Square/Squared Tool for strip size to cut squares for side triangles. I’m making 4″ finished units so I cut my strips from a folded strip 3 1/4″ wide.

Cut once diagonally.

Position two triangles on opposite sides of the center square. No need to fuss with matching the middles as the triangles are larger than they need to be. Just basically center them and try to keep the raw edges aligned.

Press seams away from the center square.

Position remaining two triangles on the remaining two sides of the center square. Again, don’t fuss too much with aligning the centers, just get them close. Stitch and press the triangles away from the center square.

Ready for the trim.

Position the Trim Down Section of the Square²™ ruler over the pieced unit. Focus on aligning the “X’s” for your particular finished size unit over the sewn seams. If they do not line up exactly, simply center the ruler over the area by finding the middle ground of all four marks. Trim up the side and across the top. For the second cut, rotate the unit, position the ruler on top of unit again lining up the “X’s”, and also lining up the cleanup lines on the ruler with the edges previously trimmed.

This ensures that you end up with a square that has proper ¼” seams on all sides and is exactly the correct size to use in your quilt project. I added 1″ strips to two sides of the units to make the units measure 4 1/2″ by 6 1/2″. I did this so when I add the binding I won’t lose the points on my square/squared unit. Measuring the correct lengths I cut the 6 1/2″ strips to add to my border additions.

The Square/Squared tool makes finished diamond in square units in six sizes from 1″ to 6″. If you require mores sizes you can purchase the Large Square/Squared Tool which can make them in sizes from 1″ to 12″.

Rainbow Kitty OBW #82 & the Star 60 Tool

The official name for this quilt is Samantha’s Rainbow Kitty. This quilt was made with love for my Granddaughter Sam. It was supposed to be finished for Christmas but it is in time for my special Valentine.

Panel by Chong-A-Hwang for Timeless Treasures

Why did I choose 5.5″ Finished Hexagons?

This panel measured 23 inches wide. I chose 5.5″ (Cut my strips 3.5″) finished hexies because 4 X 5.5 = 22″. Now I only have trim 1/2″ from both sides and my hexies will fit along the bottom and the top of the panel.

Checkerboard 60

I wanted to add a large star to my design. Using my Star 60 Tool and Checkerboard 60 Technique Sheet I was able to make a great star. I’m sorry that this is a tease for you as the Checkerboard 60 Technique Sheet will not be available until Spring 2021.

I began by deciding on what size to make my star. I wanted it twice as big as my 5.5″ finished hexies, hmmm, that means an 11″ finished star. The Checkerboard Technique sheet makes beautiful stars in 17 sizes from 2″ up to 18″ in 1″ increments. I needed to make 5.5″ Finished units. I followed technique sheet instructions for a 6″ Finished Units and will trim them so they would finish at 5.5″ units.

Step 1 – Make two strip sets.

Step 2 – Layer the strips sets one on top of the other right sides down. Using the Star 60 tool and a regular ruler establish the 60 degree angle.

From the first cut, cut additional angled sections the same width as the as the cut size of the diamond strips.

Step 3 – Pair each “A” section with a “B” section. Make sure the inner and outer diamonds are oriented correctly. The pink diamonds will be the inner part of my star. The outer diamonds are yellow.

Mark 1/4″ seam allowance using the Magic Wand.

On the edges you will be stitching together, mark the 1/4″ seam allowance across the seams on the wrong side.

Pin section A & B

Stitch your section “A” with Section “B” units.

Press the seams open.

Step 4 – Trim the outer diamond using the Star 60 tool. I trimmed using the Outer Diamond Trim Guidelines for a 5″ finished unit.

First cut.

Continue cutting side triangles.

Step 5 – Add the side triangles.

Layout the right side triangles.

Position the side triangle on top of the diamond, matching the flat corner to the edge of the diamond.

Stitch with the diamond on top.

Press toward the diamond. (Whatever you are pressing toward, goes on top.)

Layout the left side triangle.

Position the the remaining side triangle on the other side of the diamond point. Align the flat corner of the triangle with the edge of the diamond, aligning the raw edges as before.

After it is stitched, but before you press, trim the unit as shown above to remove bulk.

Press toward the side triangle.

Step 6 – Trim the pieced Star 60 unit suing the Star 60 tool. I trimmed using the 5″ finished unit guidelines.

Step 7 – Describes the trimming the final edge. I did not complete this trim. Remember, I need an 11″ finished star, which means I need 5.5″ finished units. I accomplished this by trimming the diamonds per the 5″ guidelines. I created an 11″ finished star by NOT trimming the outer edges of the star.

Layout your diamond units.

Stitch your diamond units together creating two halves.

Making Star 60’s – To make 5.5″ finished Stars, I am following the cutting instructions for 3″ Finished Units. Remember, the chart refers to UNITS not to Finished Stars! To use the chart, first determine the desired finished size of your unit, then follow the row across for the strip size for the shape you want to cut.

Cutting the Diamonds – I followed the cutting instructions for 3″ finished units. Trim one short edge at a 60 degree angle as shown above. Locate the Diamond Sub-Cut Guideline in the chart which for 3″ finished units is 4″. Align those guidelines with the raw edges of the strip and the angled cut just made as shown in the diagram. Cut along the leading edge of the tool to create oversized diamond shapes.

Cut your side triangles. For 3″ finished units the side triangle strips are 2 1/2″.

Layout the right side triangle.

Position the side triangle on top of the diamond, matching the flat corner to the edge of the diamond.

Stitch with the diamond on top.

Press toward the Diamond. Layout the remaining side triangle.

Position the the remaining side triangle on the other side of the diamond point. Align the flat corner of the triangle with the edge of the diamond, aligning the raw edges as before.

Trim the bulk as shown above.

Press toward the side triangle.

I followed the cutting instructions for 3″ finished units, BUT I’m making 5.5″ finished stars, so I’m trimming the Diamond Point using the 2 1/2″ guidelines. I do not trim the outer edges of the unit to obtain a 5.5″ finished star.

Star 60 Units

Stitch units into two halves.

Designing With the Hexagons

The final layout

After I numbered my rows, I stitched the four rows above the checkerboard star into two rows, and the same with the four rows under the checkerboard star as shown in photo 1. Photo 2 shows stitching the top and bottom row to the checkerboard star halves. Photo 3 shows the two rows joined together.

Continue to stitch rows into 4 sections, Left, Right, Top & Bottom.

I placed the bottom section right sides together to verify how much I need to trim off the sides of the panel so it will be the same width as the top and bottom hexies. In this case I trimmed 1/2″ off both sides.

You can choose to attach either the top or bottom hexies first. I chose the bottom because I wanted to control where the hexies attached to the bottom of the panel. After the hexies are laid out and stitched together we loose 1/4″ between them. I felt I could safely loose a couple of inches off the top of the panel without affecting the design. But I did not want to loose inches off the panel bottom.

I pressed the bottom hexies under 1/4″ and top stitched them to the panel.

Match up the hexies/dog ears of the left side with hexies/dog ears on the bottom. Stitch leaving about 12″ from the top of the panel.

Place the panel and partially stitched left side on a table and place the top hexies on top of the panel matching up the dog ears to establish where the top hexies will be stitched to the panel.

Pin top to the panel being sure the dog ears match up to the left side hexies.

Top Stitch the top hexies to the panel. Finish stitching the left side to the panel and top hexies.

Match up the dog ears of the right side and stitch.

Samantha’s Rainbow Kitty, measures 75″ X 70″. I will quilt it as soon as the backing arrives.

Journeys Month 5 – Homeward Bound

Welcome to Stitchin Heaven’s Journeys Month 5. My helper for Month 5 is Deb Tucker, of Studio 180 Design. This month you are going to learn to make Lemoyne Star Quarters using the Rapid Fire Lemoyne Star and Tucker Trimmer I tools. You will be using Prints 7, 9 & 11. Label your fabrics and use your best cutting skills when cutting your starter squares.

Piecing Instructions

Step 1 – Organize Strips. Place Print 9 and Print 7 into two separate piles. Use Print 7 to make the A Strip Set and Print 9 to make the B Strip Set.

Step 2 – Make Strip Sets A and Strip Sets B in the same manner as described in the Rapid Fire® Lemoyne Star basic instructions. Position each diamond strip 4¾” down from the top of the background strip. Sew the strips lengthwise and press as indicated in the diagram below. Pay close attention to proper strip alignment and pressing to ensure success.

Step 3 – First Cuts. Layer Strip Set A and Strip Set B right sides together as illustrated. Trim the ends of the strips at a 45° angle, then continue making 45° angle cuts every 3¼” across the length of the strips. You will get 8 cuts from a paired strip set. Cut the remaining strip sets in this manner until you have 20 pairs.

Step 4 – Make Second Cuts going vertically south to north, as shown. Position the ruler edge at the tip of the star strip and trim straight up. These triangles will be added to the pieced unit.

Jackie’s Tip for staying organized is to label two paper plates A & B. For Right handers, Strip “A” is on top & Strip “B” is on the bottom. Cut one unit at a time, place the “A” unit on plate marked “A” & the “B” unit on plate marked “B”. You will always know which units are A & B for pressing.

Step 5 – Arrange, position and stitch the cut pieces together into pieced triangle units. Press as shown in the diagram to yield future nesting seams.

You can chain stitch your “A” and “B” units for easier pressing
Press “A” units toward the Star Point
Press “B” units toward the side triangle

Tip: Remember “whatever you are pressing toward – goes on top”!

Step 6 – Trim down all pieced triangle units using the 12” line on the Rapid Fire® Lemoyne Star tool as shown in the diagram.

Step 7 – Assemble quarters. Arrange the sewn and trimmed A and B sections into quarter blocks. Stitch the sections together and press the seams open to best distribute bulk. You should have 20 quarter blocks total.

You can choose to press your seams open or…
You can choose to press the seams so they are all going in the same direction.

Step 8 – Trim the quarters to 6½” x 6½” with your Tucker Trimmer® I tool. Clean up the dog ears and true up the first corner as shown (this should just be a few threads at most), then rotate the unit 180o to trim the opposite corner. Align the Common Diagonal with the seam and the 6½” clean up lines with the trimmed edges to trim the remaining two sides. Repeat for all 20 quarters. Label the finished quarters Unit H.

First Trim
Second Trim

Recap: Make 20 Unit H – Homeward Bound Units.

Homeward Bound, Unit H

Congratulations, you have learned to use your Rapid Fire Lemoyne Star tool!

Something Fishy – OBW #81 & the Wedge Star Tool

Something Fishy was made with fabric called Atlantis by Sentimental Studios for Moda. I have had this 6 yard piece in my One Block Wonder (OBW) stash for 12 o 13 years. Evidently I like to age my fabric before I cut it up.

This is my second octagon OBW. Like hexagon OBW’s, octagon OBW’s can be made in many sizes. I will show you how to use the Wedge Star Tool Instructions to choose different size octagons and add different octagon blocks to your quilt. The numbered steps in this post refer to steps outlined in the Wedge Star Tool Instructions. The basic octagon OBW is made with 45 degree wedges as sown below. The Wedge Star tool instructions refer to this as the Wedge Block. We use the Wedge Block instructions to make the basic octagon OBW.

The Wedge Block instructions begin on page 7
The Wedge Star Block instructions begin on page 3

The Mixed Block can be made up of any combination of Diamond Wedges and Large Wedges, plus four corner triangles.

Download the Wedge Star Instructions here:

Cutting Chart

Use the chart on page 2 of the Wedge Star instructions, find your desired finished block size (first column), then follow the row across to determine the strip and square sizes you need to cut.

I chose 6″ finished blocks. From the first column follow to right to the “Large Wedge Strip” and see to cut the wedge strips 4″ Width of Fabric (WOF) and “Corner Square” strips 3″ by WOF.

After I have aligned my 8 repeats and trimmed one long edge so all the repeats end in the same place, I re-measure my repeat to verify how many strips I can cut.

Note: For every 2 Large Wedge strips you will need to cut 1 Corner Square strip.

I ended up with 22″ trimmed repeats, so I was able to cut four 4″ Large Wedge WOF Strips and two 3″ WOF Corner Square strips for 6″ finished octagons.

Wedge Block

Cutting the Large Wedges (Page 7, Step 2.01)

When making an octagonal OBW, we are cutting 8 layers of fabric at once. Our Large Wedge and Corner Square strips are from one fabric. Putting a new blade in your rotary cutter is important!

The cutting instructions on page 2 show you how to cut your wedges with the strip placed horizontally on the mat. I prefer to cut the wedges by placing my strips vertically on the mat. Try both and see what works best for you.

Wedges cut from one strip

Cutting the Corner Triangles (Step 2.02)

I use my Tucker Trimmer I to cut my Corner Squares from my 3″ WOF strips.

Once your Corner Squares are cut, cut them once diagonally. Each set of corner triangles contains 8 identical corner triangles. When cutting the squares diagonally, consider what design elements will be in both halves.

Constructing the Wedge Block (Step 2.03)

From each stack of 8 wedges, stitch 2 together making 4 pair, press seams open.

Remove the Dog Ears (Step 2.06)

Step 2.06

Remove the dog ears and sliver trim the wedge pair. Position the Wedge Pair on the cutting mat. Righties as shown above position it so the 90 degree corner is in the upper right (see tool instructions for left handed cutting). Align the common diagonal line on your Tucker Trimmer with the seam and slide it forward just until it meets with either edge or the point of the wedge, trim up the side and across the top. There may only be a few whiskers trimmed here. Trim all the wedge pairs.

Match up the points, stitch into halves, press seams open (Step 2.08).

Tip: Find the center of one wedge half by placing a pin where seams meet and go through the second wedge half in the same place. Align the two halves, pin on both sides of the center pin.

Remove the center pin and stitch the halves together. Press seams open.

It helps to place your octagon blocks on a design wall as you finish them.

The next step (Step 2.09), is to trim the octagon wedges that will have a corner triangle stitched to them. But before that I want to make some Wedge Star & Mixed Blocks to enhance my octagons and strengthen certain colors .

Wedge Star Block (Page 3)

Cutting the Diamonds (Step 1.01)

All my octagons will be 6″ finished blocks. Go to the chart on page 2, find the first column “Finished Block Size” move down to 6″, move across the row to “Diamond Strip”. Cut the Diamonds strips 1 3/4″ by WOF. Trim one short edge at 45 degree angle by placing the 1/4″ line of your Wedge Star tool on the top edge of the strip. Using a regular 6″by 12″ ruler, bump it up to the Wedge Star tool placing the 45 degree line of the ruler on the bottom edge of the strip.

Remove the Wedge Star tool and cut using the regular ruler.

The rule here is to cut your diamonds the same width as the diamond strip. Continue cutting Diamonds every 1 3/4″ using the ruler. See tool instructions for left handed cutting.

I wanted two color Diamonds so I chose two fabrics.

Cutting the Small Wedges (Step 1.02)

Following the chart for 6″ finished blocks, move across to the “Small Wedge Strip”. Cut the Small Wedge strips 2 3/4″ wide, WOF.

Align the small mark near the top of the tool with the top of the strip, and the line on the tool that corresponds with the width of the strip (2 3/4″).

Step 1.04 – Rotate the Wedge Star tool 180 degrees so the sharp point is closest to you. Align the same guidelines as before and continue cutting the wedges. (I prefer to place my strips vertically when cutting the wedges. Find what works best for you.)

Two fabric color Small Wedges, blue & teal.

Note: We are skipping from Step 1.04 to Step 1.06 because we are making a OBW and will address the corners later.

Piecing the Diamond Wedges

Step 1.06 – Lay out the Diamonds and Small Wedges as shown. I am making two color diamonds first I laid out the Yellow diamonds with the blue small wedges.

Step 1.07 – Take a small wedge from the right hand side and position it it on top.

Note: My interpretation is to place a diamond right sides together with a small wedge as show above.

Stitch small wedges to the diamonds right sides together as show above. Press toward the Diamonds.

Note: Remember that “whatever you are pressing toward goes on top”! So, you would place all your units with the diamond on top.

Step 1.08 – With the Diamond on top, stitch along the matched edges with a ¼” seam. Press the seam toward the Diamond and trim off the “dog ear”. Repeat with the rest of the diamonds.

Trim the Dog Ears

Step 1.09 & 1.10

Step 1.09 – Using the other pile of Small Wedges, take one and position it on the other side of the Diamond point. Align the raw edges and center the shapes right sides together as shown above.

Step 1.10 – With the Diamond on top, stitch with a ¼” seam. Press the seam toward the Small Wedge. Repeat with the rest of the Diamonds.

Step 1.11 – Use the Wedge Star™ tool to trim each Diamond Wedge unit to an exact size.

Step 1.12 – Position the unit right side up on the cutting mat. Righties point the Diamond toward the 2 o’clock position, lefties point the Diamond toward the 10 o’clock position. Align the desired finished block size lines with the sewn seams. Trim along both sides of the ruler. See tool instructions for left handed cutting.

Layout wedges. Stitch wedges together into pairs.

Press seams open.

Step 1.13 – Remove the “dog ears”.

Remove the dog ears and sliver trim the wedge pair. Position the Wedge Pair on the cutting mat. Righties as shown above position it so the 90 degree corner is in the upper right (see tool instructions for left handed cutting). Align the common diagonal line on your Tucker Trimmer with the seam and slide it forward just until it meets with eight the edge or the point of the wedge, trim up the side and across the top. There may only be just a few whiskers trimmed her. Trim all the wedge pairs.

Step 1.15 – Stitch quarters in halves, then stitch halves together, pressing seams open.

Step 1.16 – To turn your octagon into a square you will need to add triangles to the corners. Determine which wedge sections will be located in the corners of your
finished block. Align the Outside Edge Trim Line on the Wedge Star™ tool with the seams of the Diamond on one corner wedge. Trim along the edge of the tool. Repeat this for the other three corners, making sure you are only trimming every other edge. The remaining edges will be trimmed after the corners are added.

Trim Mixed blocks the same as the Wedge Star Block
Final layout.

Mixed Blocks – See page 10

Mixed block variations combining wedge star and large wedge units.

Mixed blocks are made by simply combining Wedge Stars with Large Wedges as shown above. Once I made several Wedge Star Blocks and Mixed Blocks I added them to my other octagons. The fabric choices for my Wedge Stars and Mixed blocks was to strengthen my orange/golds and turquoises.

Prepping Wedge Blocks for adding the Corners: If there is a way to square up a difficult unit/block Deb Tucker will find it!

Step 2.09 (Pg. 8) – Determine which Large Wedges are going to have Corner Triangles attached.
Step 2.10 – Make a halfway registration mark on these four wedges. Wedges can be folded in half matching the seams and then lightly pressed to give a centerfold line. Or the centerline of the tool can be placed on the sewn seam with the point of the tool at the center. Mark with a removable marking tool.

Note: Add a flower pin to the top wedge unit for each block to aid in orientation. This will help you throughout the trimming process.


Step 2.11 – Place your Wedge Star® tool upside down, with the Invisigrip™ facing up. Find the Block Center dimension for your project on the chart.


Step 2.12 – Measure down that distance from the flat edge of the tool and make a mark on the back of the tool, across the centerline as illustrated. Use a fine point Sharpie® marker. For our example, make a mark 3¼” from the tool edge.

Step 2.13 – Working on your cutting mat, place the intersection of the centerline of the tool and the Sharpie® marked line on the center of the sewn block. At the same time, align the centerline of the tool with the halfway registration mark on the fabric block.

Step 2.14 – Cut along the flat edge of the tool. You should only be trimming off a small amount of fabric. If you are trimming more than ¼”, recheck your tool mark!

Step 2.15 – Repeat for the other three Corner Wedges.


For prepping Wedge Star & Mixed Blocks for adding corners see tool instructions page 5, Step 1.16.

Add Corners:

Block corners are trimmed and ready for Corners

Choose corner triangles that will help blend the octagons and create flow.

When four octagons are put together, there is a diamond spaced shape between them. You fill this space with 4 identical triangles cut from the 3″ Corner Strip.

Keep adding corners to the octagons and place back on the design wall.

Corners have been added to all the inner octagons.

I add corners to all the inner octagons first, then continue adding them to the outer edges.

Now all the octagons have 4 corner

Squaring up the Octagon Blocks

Step 2.18 – For blocks that finish to 12” or less, we prefer to use our Tucker Trimmer®. Consult the Block Cut Size in the chart and align the common diagonal and sizing diagonal with the marks made for the previous trimming. Make sure that the intersection of the tool lines is over the center. Trim two sides. Rotate the block 180° and line up the diagonal lines as well as the clean up lines with the trimmed edges. Trim the final two sides.

My octagon blocks will be 6″ finished. Therefore, I can use my Tucker Trimmer I and square up my blocks to 6 1/2″. Make sure the intersecting lines for 6 1/2″ are over the center of the block and trim as shown above.

All my octagons are now trimmed to 6 1/2″ and are ready to be sewn into rows.

Tip: To line up your blocks, pin where the seams intersect on both blocks. Pin on both sides, then pull out the pin in the seams and stitch.

See how nicely the points line up when the blocks are trimmed and squared.

Something Fishy

Something Fishy, 72″ x 72″

As you can see, this project was closely supervised by Tucker!

Included in your Wedge Star Tool Instructions is a free project “Freelancer”.

Freelancer

Download the Freelancer Supply list in 3 sizes:

Journeys Month 4 – Winged Nine Patch

Welcome to Stitchin Heaven’s Journeys BOM Month 4 – Winged Nine Patch. My helper for Month 4 is Diane Marvin, Certified Instructor for Studio 180 Design. This month you are going to learn to make Four Patches with Frames using prints 5, 6, 7 & 9, Center Square with print 8 and Chevrons using prints 5, 6 & 11. Required tools are the Four Patch Square Up and Corner Pop.

Prints 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 11

Carefully follow your cutting instructions for each print using your best cutting and measuring skills.

Jackie’s Note: To keep organized when cutting the same print for multiple units I labeled 3 plates for Print 5: one for “Four Patches Strip sets A & B. One for Four Patch Frames Strip Set C. One for Replacement Triangles.

Piecing Instructions

Step 1 – Use the diagram on page 9 to make your strip sets. Position two strips right sides together and align the long edges. Stitch with your best ¼” seam. Press the seam toward Print 5 in all strip sets.

Strip Set A – Prints 5 & 6
Strip Set B – Prints 5 & 7

Step 2 – Layer Strip Set A on top of Strip Set B, right sides together, making sure that the Print 5 fabrics are positioned as shown in the diagram. Nest the seams well. Sub-cut along the strip at 2¼” increments until you have 16 sub-cut pieces.

Step 2 – Layer and Sub-Cut at 2 1/4″ increments

Step 3 – Sub-cut Strip Set C. Do not layer it with anything, just make cuts every 2” until you have 16 pieces.

Step 4 – Stitch down the long side of the layered A/B pairs. Consistently feed Print 5 under the machine first. This will make for a nicer alignment in the center.

Remove 2 or 3 striches

Step 5 – Press the unit so that the seams spin. To spin the seam, lay the sewn seam east to west on the mat, remove the stitches in the seams on both sides that run north to south. Press so that all seams go in the same direction.

Swirl and press.

Step 6 – Trim. Locate the circle for the 3” finished size on your Four Patch Square Up® tool and position the circle over the sewn seam intersection in the center of your four patch unit, and the dashed lines with your seams. Trim the first two sides.

Right Handed Trimming

Step 7 – Rotate the unit 180 degrees . Realign the 3” Finished Size circle with the center and the dashed lines with your seams. Also make sure that the outside trimmed edge of the unit is aligned with the 3½” cleanup lines. Trim the final two sides. Repeat steps 6 and 7 for the remaining units.

Second Trim

Step 8 – Stitch a 2”x 3½” Print 5 rectangle to the side of each four patch as shown. Press toward the Print 5 rectangle.

Step 8

Step 9 – Stitch a Strip Set C piece onto the pieced unit as shown. Press toward the C piece.

Step 9

Chevrons

Step 10 – Layer two 2”x 5” Print 11 rectangles wrong sides together. Carefully align the edges. On your Corner Pop® tool, find the 1½” Cut Away Corners line. Position the 1½” Cut Away lines of the tool over the corner of the rectangles as shown. Trim. Repeat for the remaining rectangles.

Step 10

Step 11 – Center the long edge of one 2¾” Print 6 replacement triangle on the trimmed corner of each rectangle.

Step 11, part 1

Step 11 Cont.: Stitch with the rectangle on top using an accurate ¼” seam. Separate the rectangles into two piles as shown in the diagram. Press the seams of the pile on the left toward the triangle and the seams of the right pile toward the rectangle.

Step 12 – Position the 1½” Corner Trim Down line of the tool over the sewn seam. Align the diagonal guideline with the seam and the edges of the unit with the edge and lines on the tool. Trim the corner. Repeat for all the rectangles.

Step 12

Step 13 – Separate the rectangles into two piles as shown. Turn the right pile (with the replacement triangle slanting from upper right to lower left) wrong side up.

Step 14 – Cut. Use the Corner Pop® tool and the 1½” Cut Away Corners line and cut away the corner opposite Print 6. Make sure that you have the piece positioned how it is in the diagram so that you are cutting off the correct corner to make the chevron. You will cut with 16 units right side up and 16 units right side down. Cut the corner off once you have confirmed that you are cutting in the correct spot.

Step 15 – Repeat steps 11 &12 for the cut away corner using the Print 5 replacement triangles.

Step 15

Step 16 – Lay out the pieced rectangles as shown. Position two of them right sides together leaving them in the same orientation and stitch down the long side. Press the seam open.

Step 16

Block Construction

Step 17 – Lay out the framed four patches, chevrons, and center square so that it looks like the diagram.

Step 17

Step 18 – Stitch the units together into rows and then stitch the rows together to create the block. Press as shown in the diagram. You will have 4 blocks when you are done. Label them Block G.

Block G Winged Nine Patch

Congratulations, not only did you expand your knowledge of the Four Patch Square Up tool by making Four Patches with Frames, you also learned to use the Corner Pop tool by making Chevron units!

I’m Repeating Myself Again – OBW #80

What is a One Block Wonder (OBW)? I bought Maxine Rosenthal’s book “One Block Wonders” in 2006 and was totally awestruck! So much so, that I have made 79 hexagon OBW’s since. Whether you are making hexagons or octagons your are creating kaleidoscope blocks – each one unique by using one fabric, one shape for one of kind quilts! With hexagon OBW’s you cut 6 identical repeats and with octagon OBW’s you cut 8 identical repeats.

Octagons are used in the cover photo.

In 2007 I bought Alexander Henry’s fabulous fabric “Lion Eyes”. I always buy at least 6 yards. This time I had 12 yards in my stash.

I made my 27th hexagon OBW and named it “Just Lion Around” It was included in Maxine Rosenthal’s 4th book One Block Wonders of World.

Just Lion Around 2007, OBW #27

I made my first OBW in 2006. That year I made 16 OBW’s. It only took me 14 years to finally make my first octagon One Block Wonder!

Cutting the Repeats: I cut my 8 identical repeats and aligned them just as I would for a hexagon OBW. Now it is time to cut octagon and corner triangle strips. You can make octagon OBW’s in any size. Following Maxine’s suggestion I cut my octagon strips 4″ wide. Maxine said to cut the strips for the corner triangles 2 3/4″ wide. I am a Studio 180 Design Certified Instructor. You may be able to take the girl out of the studio…but you will never take the studio (180) out of the girl!

Instead of 2 3/4″ strips, I cut my corner triangle strips 3″ wide, that would give me a little more to trim off the completed octagon blocks. After I aligned and trimmed one long edge of the repeats, I re-measure the width of my repeat to verify how may strips I can cut. My trimmed, aligned repeat measured 23″. For every two strips used to make octagons, cut one strip for the “Sensational Squares” (corner triangles). If I cut four 4″ strips and two 3″ strips it equals 22″. Now I know I have enough fabric in my repeat without cutting myself short.

First cut

As I said earlier: You may be able to take the girl out of the studio…but you will never take the studio (180) out of the girl! I am using Studio 180 Design’s Wedge Star Tool to cut my wedges for the octagon blocks.

The beauty of the Wedge Star tool is you can make octagons in sizes 3″ to 24″.

I found it easier to cut both left and right wedges by placing the octagon strip vertically on my cutting table and pull the strip toward me as I cut. The Wedge Star tool instructions show how to cut the units horizontally also:

Continue cutting your wedge units. I got 23 wedges per strip.

From the 3″ strips cut your 3″ squares using your Tucker Trimmer I.

Cut you squares diagonally once and set aside.

Because hexagons are made with equilateral triangles you have 3 choices as how to design your block. With Octagons you only have one choice, the narrow end of the wedge is always the center.

Align two wedges and chain stitch the four pair.

As with hexagons, press all seams open. I love my Strip Sticks for that.

Remove “dog ear” and sliver trim the wedge pair. Righties orient the wedge pair so the 90 degree corner is in the upper right (lefties orient the wedge pair so the 90 degree corner is in the upper left). Align the common diagonal line on the Tucker Trimmer with the seam and slide it toward the corner just until the sides of the tool touch the very edge of the wedge pair and trim. Note there may be just a few whiskers trimmed here. This is called Trueing up your 90 degree angles and will create a much more square unit.

Match up two wedge pairs, stitch them together and press seams open.

Find the center of the two wedge halves by placing a pin where the two seams meet in both units and align the halves. Pin close to both sides of the first pin, then remove the pin in the center. This will help to center you octagon wedge halves.

Stitch your wedge halves together.

Press your seams open.

I placed my octagons on the design wall as I made them. This helped me to see what I had.

Here I am looking at life through rose colored glasses. again Time to sort the octagons. Looking at the octagons through red plastic helps me to sort the octagons by value. If you didn’t know, I have been battling breast cancer. I am responding well to treatment, but as my hair grows back, I’m noting a resemblance to the Old Man Dancing for the Six Flags commercials.

Sorting the octagons by predominate color or value was more difficult than I thought it would be. I think because the octagons don’t nest with each other as the hexagons do, you don’t get the same flow and movement. I’m saying this because after I added the corner triangles i wasn’t as happy with the design. Take your designing!

Tip: This is most important tip! Place a flower pin in the top wedge of each octagon! By doing this you will be able to easily orient the octagons as you remove and place them back on the design wall. It will keep your brains from falling out!

Adding the “Sensational Squares” (corner triangles).

One set of corner triangles is laid out as shown above making a kaleidoscope square.

Those squares will fit into the space between 4 octagons.

When you step back from the design wall, the square will appear to be gone as the 4 octagons blend together.

I worked with one row at time, deciding which set of corners to add. Remove one octagon at a time and stitch the triangle to the appropriate octagon wedge. In affect, you will be adding corners that effect two rows at a time. In the end, each octagon will have a different triangle on each corner.

Center the octagon wedge over the corner triangle and stitch. Press toward the corner triangle. Remember Deb Tucker’s tip when pressing: “whatever you are pressing toward, always goes on top”!

Above shows the corner triangles added to the inner octagons.

Once the inner octagons have the corners added, continue adding the final corner triangles to the outside edges of the octagons.

Trimming the Octagon Blocks: The octagon units need to be squared up to 6 1/2″.

If you don’t know the beauty of using the Tucker Trimmer you will love this. The Tucker Trimmer is marked with a “Common Diagonal line and Size Lines to help you perfectly center each unit or block for trimming. For righties the Common diagonal line is placed on the center seam going from the bottom left to the upper right. The 6 1/2″ size line is positioned from the upper left to the lower right going through the center of the block. The size line and common diagonal line should intersect in the center of the block centering it perfectly for squaring up. Trim up the right side and across the top. Rotate the block place the 6” clean up lines of the Tucker Trimmer on just trimmed lines of the block. Trim up the right side and across the top.

When all the octagons are trimmed it’s time to stitch your blocks into rows and then join your rows to complete your quilt. My layout was 9 X 10 = 90 – 6″ finished blocks measuring 57″ X 63″ unquilted. I learned a lot in this process. I think my layout would have been more satisfying if I had left it more random. I was trying to create an oval shape with the lighter blocks in the center. But there wasn’t enough contrast between the medium and light blocks. I’ve always been a little contrast challenged.

Check out my post Hallucinating With My Spirit Animal for more ways to use your Wedge Star Tool.

Hallucinations

The Spiderweb Quilt Below can also be made using the Wedge Star tool.

Spiderweb Quilt

Journeys Month 3 – Flying Geese

Welcome to Stitchin Heaven’s Journeys BOM Month 3. This month you will be learning to make flying geese the Deb Tucker way, using your Wing Clipper I. My helper this month is Deb Tucker herself! As always use your best cutting, stitching and pressing skills. We will be using prints 1, 2 & 5. Carefully cut your starter squares and let’s go!

Prints 1, 2 & 5

Piecing Instructions Flying Geese Construction

Step 1 – Mark Squares. Begin with one large Print 1 square and two Print 2 and two Print 5 small squares. On the wrong side of each small square, mark two stitching lines ¼” on either side of the center diagonal. I like to use my Quilter’s Magic Wand™ for this task.

Step 1

Step 2 – Position the two Print 2 small squares in opposite diagonal corners of the large square, right sides together. Nudge the small squares in toward the center a few threads from the edge of the large square and align the drawn lines.

Nudge the small squares toward the center of the large square.
Step 2

Step 3 – Stitch on the two marked lines, then cut between the stitching lines along the center diagonal of the squares. Press your seams toward the small triangles.

Tip: Stitch just inside of the drawn lines. This will give you more to trim later.
Step 3
Step 3 Cont.

Step 4 – Position two Print 5 small squares, one in each corner of your heart shaped units. Nudge these squares a few threads in from the edge of the large triangle.

Step 4

Step 5 – Stitch along the two marked lines.

Step 5

Step 6 – Cut between the stitched lines along the center diagonal of the small squares and press toward the small triangle.

Step 6
Step 6

Step 7 – Position your Wing Clipper® I tool over your unit, aligning the correct diagonal guidelines of the ruler with the seams of your unit and trim two sides. Rotate the unit 180° and align the 3½”x 6½” horizontal and vertical guide lines with the edges of the unit. Align the “X” on the Wing Clipper® I with the seam intersection of your unit and trim again. Repeat for the remaining units. You will end up with 24 geese that have print 2 on the left, label these as Unit E, and 24 geese that have print 2 on the right, label these as Unit F.

First Trim
Second Trim
4 Flying Geese

Congratulations! You have now learned to make flying geese using the Wing Clipper I.

It’s December! Time for Christmas Tree Quilts

I love Christmas & I love Christmas Tree Quilts! Over the years I have made several and decided to share some with you. Studio 180 Design tools gives you several ways to easily make Christmas Trees.

I Believe

I made this 7 years ago for my Granddaughter Samantha. I Believe uses the V Block tool. Below is the supply list:

Deck the Halls

I made Deck the Halls for Northcott Fabrics in 2019. It is made with Tucker Trimmer I & Wing Clipper I. Below is the supply list:

Split Rects Christmas Tree

The Split Rects Christmas Tree wall hanging is made with the Split Rects tool. The supply list is below:

Wing Clipper Wall Hanging

The Wing Clipper wall hanging is made with 4 Flying Geese using the Wing Clipper I. The supply list is below:

Kermits Christmas Tree

This Skinny Christmas Tree was made using all 10 sizes the Wing Clipper I makes. Supply List is below:

Happy Holidays everyone!

Journeys Month 2 – Triangle Units

Welcome to Stitchin Heaven’s Journeys Month 2. My helper for Month 2 is Amy Lemke, a talented graphic artist for Studio 180 Design. This month you are going to learn to make Half Square Triangles (HSTs) and Combination Units with your Tucker Trimmer I with Prints 1, 2, 5, 10, & 11. Label your fabrics and use your best cutting skills when cutting your starter squares.

Prints 1, 2, 5, 10 & 11.

Tip: I use plain paper plates and write on them what it is I have cut out. For instance, if you are new to using a Tucker Trimmer, I would label 6 paper plates: one for each print. Using a pen or pencil label the first plate “Print 1, Combination Units (unit D)”, and so on.

Half Square Triangle Construction

Note: For more information and left handed cutting and trimming directions, refer to the instruction that came with your Tucker Trimmer.

Prints 5, 10, & 11.

Step 1 – Mark two stitching lines ¼” on either side of the center diagonal. Draw the lines on the wrong side of all the 7” squares from Print 11. I like to use my Quilter’s Magic Wand™ for this task.

Mark using a Magic Wand.

Step 2 – Layer the 7” Print 11 squares right sides together with the 7” squares from Prints 5 and 10. Stitch on the lines, then cut down the middle. Press away from Print 11 or open.

Layer.

Stitch and cut apart.

Press.

Step 3 – Trim the units to 6½” using the Tucker Trimmer® I. Align the 6½” Sizing Diagonal with the seam and trim the first two sides.

First Trim

Step 4 – Rotate the unit 180 degrees and align the 6½” Sizing Diagonal with the seam as well as the 6½” cleanup lines with the outside edge. Trim the remaining two sides to create your precise Half Square Triangle units. Label the units made with Print 5 Unit C, and label the units with Print 10 Unit B.

Second Trim

Make 8 each from prints 10 & 11 and prints 5 & 11.

Combination Unit Construction

Prints 1, 2 & 11

Step 5 – Repeat steps 1 and 2 using the 7½” squares from Print 1 and Print 2 to make 4 Half Square Triangles. Press away from Print 2 or open. Do not trim!

Starter Squares

Step 6 – Mark two stitching lines ¼” on either side of the center diagonal line of the pieced Half Square Triangles.

Mark back of HSTs

Step 7 – Position the pieced squares right sides together with the 7½” Print 11 squares. Note that the edges are not intended to match. Stitch on the lines, then cut down the middle. Press toward the large triangle.

Stitch, cut apart & press.

Step 8 – Trim the units to 6½” using the Tucker Timmer® I. Align the 6½” Sizing Diagonal with the long seam and the Common Diagonal with the short seam. Trim the first two sides.

First Trim

Step 9 – Rotate the unit 180o and align the Sizing and Common Diagonals with the seam as well as the 6½” cleanup lines with the trimmed edge. Trim the remaining two sides to create your precise Combination units. Label them Unit D.

Second Trim

Congratulations, you have learned to make half square triangles and combination units using your Tucker Trimmer I.

Reflection – OBW #79

I don’t know about your fabric stash, but sometimes mine has years to mellow. Some of you may know that I am undergoing treatment for breast cancer. Before chemo started I went to my One Block Wonder Stash to choose fabrics to cut. I thought even if I don’t feel well most of the time, surely if I have my equilateral triangles cut out I should be able to do some sewing.

English Countryside

In 2008 I purchased English Countryside by Sue Beevers in two color ways, green and purple.

I made this One Block Wonder for my dear friend Debi who was undergoing breast cancer treatment in 2009.

When I chose to work on the green English Countryside for me I forgot for a minute that the purple version was also in honor of those of battling breast cancer 11 years earlier.

Reflection OBW #79, 57″ x 63″

This is such a large print I tried to use a big enough piece to showcase the beauty of the fabric. It may not be pink, but this quilt is made in honor of all us Pink Warriors. Thank you Sue Beevers for making such beautiful fabric.