Tag Archives: quilting

The Reveal of Island Batik Box 2

I received my 2018 Box 2 from Island Batik and decided to video the reveal to share with you.  Thank You Island Batik, Aurifil & Hobbs for your generosity.

#islandbatik #islandbatikambassador  #Aurifil #hobbsbatting

A Field of Popped ‘V’s”

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The Island Batik Ambassador’s Challenge for July is “Pattern Play, Secondary Pattern”.  I chose a simple design using BlockBuster  18 A Popped V  pattern from Deb Tucker which uses Studio 180 Design V Block & Corner Pop tool and the Side Kick High/Low technique sheet.

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Last year I made four Popped V blocks and loved the secondary pattern that came from putting together the blocks.  Notice the nice sharp points?

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I love my bright orange & green Island Batik fabrics.  But, this time my blocks looked a little different…there’s a story there!  I don’t know about you, but when I’m at a quilting retreat with my quilting buddies I’m usually  talking way too much and that’s how mistakes are made!  My in-attention to detail led me down the primrose path of error!

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I was organizing my fabrics, I decided to make twelve 12″ blocks.  When making a quilt block, we refer to Finished & Cut size units.  The Finished size is the what the unit measures after it is sewn into the block,  the Cut Size measurement is the size of the unit before it is sewn into the block.  The Cut Size is what size you trim the unit to before sewing it into the block. 

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Checking the size chart in my V block instructions, I needed to cut 5″ strips to make 4″ finished V Block units.  So far no problem.  I pop off the corners of my V Block units with my Corner Pop tool and replace the corners with my beautiful orange Island Batik.  I popped off the corners of the center squares and continue on.

Here was my downfall, I had not cut the starter strips for the Sidekick units.  Instead of checking the technique sheet, I grabbed the Blockbuster pattern and looked at the “Cut Size” of 4 1/2″!  Drat!!!!  I cut all the background squares smaller than they needed to be.  I continued to trim the squares for the replacement side triangles.  I stitched the side triangles to squares, thinking “this doesn’t look right”, but I still kept yapping away, going down the primrose path of error.

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Needless to say my sidekicks lost their points!  That makes me “Pointless”, something I try to avoid at all costs!  I did not have enough fabric to make new sidekick units.  My secondary design has dull points, but it is a lesson learned to pay attention!

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The moral of this story is, when you find yourself wandering through “A Field of Popped V’s”, don’t end up pointless!

These beautiful fabrics are all from Island Batik and stitched with Aurifil thread.  Quilt measures 45″ x 57″.

#islandbatik #aurifilthread #Debtucker #studio180design #VBlocks #CornerPop #Quiltersdreambatting

Crossfire

The fabrics in the post were generously given to me by Northcott Fabrics.

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I chose Northcott fabrics from the Sew Musical Row by Row Palette 2018.  When I choose my fabrics from Northcott, I get so excited when they are delivered.  As soon as I touch the fabric, I feel the quality.  These colors are luscious with just enough texture to give depth and interest.

Crossfire is a Studio 180 Design pattern designed by talented Certified Instructor Sarah Furrer.  It is a companion pattern for the Large Square/Squared tool.

The block featured in this quilt is called “Bird of Paradise”.  The pattern describes this quilt as “whirling stars with accents and chains of black and grey.  A new fun variation of a Flying Goose makes for a star with loads more sparkle”, and it does.

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If you follow me, you know I love to organize my quilt making process by labeling paper plates for my block pieces as I cut them out.  I never get lost or forget what the pieces are for.  All my block pieces are cut and ready to put together.

Star Blocks:  You will be making 8 star blocks, they will be made in pairs.  Each pair will contain the same colors, but their arrangements will give you two different looking blocks.  Label one of the colors in each pair as Color 1 & Color 2.  If you follow the instructions in the pattern you wont have any trouble.  After construction the diamond square units are trimmed to the cut size of 6.5″ x 6.5″

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Beautiful, perfectly trimmed units leaving a 1/4″ seam allowance, so I will not lose my points.  After all…no one wants to be pointless!

Next, we make half square triangles and perfectly trim them using our Large Square/Squared tool.

Lay out your trimmed half square triangles and the and two white triangles as shown.  Work with one triangle at a time, stitch & carefully press toward the white triangle as not to distort the shape.

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Laying Out the Blocks:   Pay close attention to Step 10.  Split your pieced geese into two piles of four.  Lay out your side triangles so that on one pile you have four Color 1 side triangles on the right side & four Color 2 side triangles on the left side.  The other pile will have four Color 2 side triangles on the right side & four Color 1 side triangles on the left side.  If you lay them as I did above for every color combination, you will be fine.

It is very important to pay attention to Step 11:  Position the right side triangle so that Color 1 shows a bit beyond the white along the top edge.  Stitch and press toward the side triangle.  Trim the units according to pattern instructions and put your blocks together.

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Crossfire is a fun, skill expanding pattern.  Finished quilt measures 60″ x 84″.

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Blast From The Past

The fabrics featured in this post were given to me by Island Batik. 

Modern Batik Challenge 39

The Island Batik Ambassador’s challenge for June is “Modern Batik”.  Lord have mercy!  I had no idea what to do.  I love all types of quilts.  For some reason I wondered……what colors were popular in 1953?  A search on Pinterest revealed an O’Brien Paints Color Card from 1953!  It must be a sign!

I racked my brain.  I had these really cool precut rolls of 5″ WOF strips I’d received in my box “O” fabric from Island Batik.

Last year I was constantly looking for quilt blocks containing Shaded Four Patch units. This year it seems to be Split Rects units that have my mind whirling.

2 TU SR Unit Types

3 TU SR 5 thru 8

5 TU SR 12 thru 16

The above photo’s are my teaching step outs that explain the process of making Spilt Rects Units in case you weren’t sure what I was talking about.

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I chose 8 – 5″ WOF strips of color & cut 8 – 5″ strips of neutral.  Each strip yielded 12 pair mirror image elongated triangles for a total of 192 – 2″ x 4″ finished Split Rects Units that I will put together to make a multi-faceted Diamond unit.

I Combined the Split Rects units to make multifaceted diamonds.

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I was very closely supervised during this part.

I had an idea of what I wanted, but wasn’t sure how to get there.  I had 48 diamond units but needed to add something more.  I decided on Rapid Fire Lemoyne Stars.

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I went to Island Batik stash and used 2 1/2″ strips from Spoolin’ Around.  These beautiful pieces of batik have been hand dyed by skilled fabric artists in the garden village of Sanur, Bali.

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This is what I came up with.  Is it modern?  The challenge description was “must incorporate ONE of the characteristics of modern quilts as defined by the Modern Quilt Guild:  the use of bold colors & prints, high contrast & graphic areas of solid color, improvisational piecing, minimalism, expansive negative space, alternate grid work”.

I may have hit one or two points!  But if you look to the past for inspiration what can you expect!  “Blast From The Past” measures 42′ x 62″.

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As always, my quilts are lovingly pieced with Aurifil thread!

#islandbatik #debtucker #studio180design #aurifilthread

The Heron

The Artisan Spirit, Water Garden fabric in this post was given to me by Northcott Fabrics for the Creators Club.

This is my 63rd One Block Wonder, and I love it!  It came out better than I had anticipated.  This OBW started as a 28″ x 42″ panel.

When choosing fabric for a One Block Wonder (OBW)  I look  for a large repeat and a large design in colors that I like.  OBW’s require 6 repeats of fabric plus more if you want to put the original fabric in the border.  With a panel, the repeat is pre-determined.  I bought 7 panels, one to integrate into the top of the quilt and 6 for the blocks.

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The process starts with aligning your repeats, evening up one end and cutting them into 3 3/4″ WOF strips.  With a 24″ repeat I get 6 strips, but this had a 28″ repeat. Bonus, I got 7 WOF strips.  I was able to cut equilateral triangles for  127 .hexagon blocks

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There are several 60 degree rulers out there.  I prefer to cut my triangles using a 6″ x 12″ Olfa ruler with a 60 line.

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Each stack of six triangles is a kaleidoscope giving you 3 choices on how to stitch your block together.  I have free, detailed video tutorials available here on my site and on YouTube that guide you through the process of making a One Block Wonder.  Plus you should check out Maxine Rosenthal’s books, One Block Wonder’s, One Block Wonders Encore, One Block Wonders Cubed and One Block Wonders of the World (2 of my OBW’s are included in that book).

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Usually I wait till all my blocks are sewn before going to the design wall.  I was so excited that every few blocks I had to start designing.  When constructing OBW blocks, you stitch 3 triangles together, pressing all seams open and then sew the other 3  triangles together.  DO NOT sew the center seam.  Simply overlap the halves at the center and pin it.  My goal with this panel was to design it so it seemed the colors were swirling right off the panel.

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Once you have a design you like it’s time to sew the blocks into rows.

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Un-pin the blocks one row at a time and sew into rows, press all seams open.  I love my pressing stick.  It makes it much easier to press all the seams open without disturbing what was previously pressed.

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Stitch your rows together.  I love my Clover Fork Pins.  They are thin and grip and hold the fabric in place.

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Did I tell you to press all seams open?  That pressing stick really helps.

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Putting together a One Block Wonder made using a panel in the quilt top is a little trickier than with just stitched rows.  I divided rows into four sections to attach them to the panel.  It is like making a log cabin block.  I wanted the rows to attach in certain places so color seemed as though it continued right off the panel.  I began by trimming the bottom section first and attaching it to the panel.

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I could now attach the rows to the right to the panel, using a partial seam and leaving room to adjust the top section of triangles and then add the rows to left of the panel.

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I trimmed the edges of the quilt to square it up.  I love it, but still wanted to soften the panel edges.

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I did not use all the blocks in the quilt top design.  I sewed the left over blocks together and trimmed them to make smaller hexagons.  I randomly placed them along the edges of the panel and appliqued them down.

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The finished quilt measures 60″ x 68″.  I did not feel it needed a border.  Thank you to Northcott Fabrics and Water Garden designer Ira Kennedy. I really love this quilt.

For OBW inspiration check out the Facebook page “One Block Wonder Quilt Forum”.  I am available to teach One Block Wonder Workshops. 

#northcottfabrics # Northcottcreatorsclub #oneblockwonders #OBW #Watergarden

 

What’s on My Design Wall Today!

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I am having so much fun!  I don’t even have all the blocks designed yet, I keep going to the design wall.  This panel is Artisan Spirit, Water Garden by Northcott.  I am making it as part of Northcott’s Creative Club.  I can’t wait to finish it!  Have you ever made a One Block Wonder using panels?

Pillow Possibilities

The products featured in this post were given to my by Island Batik.

Playful Pillows

The Island Batik challenge for May is “Playful Pillows”.  As I was thinking about what pillow design I would choose, it occurred to me I had a wealth of ideas at my fingertips.  So many of my favorite quilt patterns have blocks large enough for a pillow.  I decided I would make the center block from Deb Tucker’s “Carolina Lily: One Block” wall quilt pattern.

DTP005_-_No_Y_Carolina_Lily_-_One_Block_1024x1024Carolina Lily is a companion pattern for the Wing Clipper I.

My fabrics from Island Batik & threads from Aurifil.

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For each of the 3 flower blocks you will need 4 flying geese units.  Two of the flying geese units will have one pink point & one green point as shown above.  Deb Tucker’s method for constructing flying geese requires one large square and 4 small squares.  The large square is my background fabric. Three of the small squares are my pink fabric, and one is the green fabric.  Using your Magic Wand draw two diagonal lines on the back of your small squares.

To make a flying geese units position one green square and one pink square right sides together in diagonally opposite corners of the one large square.  Do Not align the raw edges, instead nudge them in toward the center just a few threads & overlapping the two small squares.  Stitch on the lines and cut apart.

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Press the seams toward the smaller triangles.

Position the remaining pink squares in the corner of the previously pieced units.  Nudge the squares as you did before.  Stitch on the lines and cut apart as before.

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You now have four flying geese units, two with pink points and two with one green & one pink point.  For Right handed cutting position your geese unit horizontally on the cutting mat so it points toward you.  Align the diagonal guide lines of the Wing Clipper with the sewn seams of the flying geese unit.  Trim up the side and across the top.  (See your tool instructions for left handed cutting.)

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Rotate the unit and reposition the Wing Clipper to align cleanup guidelines with the previously trimmed raw edges and the “X” at the top with the intersection of the seams.  Trim up the side and across the top.  Do this for all your geese units.

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Construct your lily block according to pattern instructions.  The lily block measures about  a 16 1/2″, I added 2 1/2″ borders all around it.  I like the inside of the pillow to be neat with no raw edges showing.  I want to quilt this block so I cut a backing and batting larger than my block and pin basted it.

I used my walking foot and cross hatched the basket portion of the block.

I was carefully supervised during this process.

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Once I finished with the basket, I outlined the flower parts and squared up the pillow top.

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My pillow top now measures 20 1/2″.  I cut two pieces of fabric 12″ x 20 1/2″.  On each piece, along one of the 20 1/2″ edges fold it over about 1/4″, press it & fold it over again and press it.  Stitch on the pressed over edges for a nice finish.  Position these two pieces on the pillow with WRONG sides together aligning the raw edges so the finished edges overlap in the middle.  Pin in place and stitch around the outside edges of the pillow using a 1/4″ seam allowance.

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Now you have a pillow with raw edges around the outside edge.  I like to add a binding just like it was a quilt.  That way the inside of the pillow is completely finished with no unfinished edges, which is nice for washing the pillow case.

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I made this pillow for my sister Mary, but I think Tucker & Zoey are claiming it!

#islandbatik #Aurifilthread #islandbatikambassador #debtucker #studio180design