Category Archives: Studio 180 Design

Journeys Month 4 – Winged Nine Patch

Welcome to Stitchin Heaven’s Journeys BOM Month 4 – Winged Nine Patch. My helper for Month 4 is Diane Marvin, Certified Instructor for Studio 180 Design. This month you are going to learn to make Four Patches with Frames using prints 5, 6, 7 & 9, Center Square with print 8 and Chevrons using prints 5, 6 & 11. Required tools are the Four Patch Square Up and Corner Pop.

Prints 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 11

Carefully follow your cutting instructions for each print using your best cutting and measuring skills.

Jackie’s Note: To keep organized when cutting the same print for multiple units I labeled 3 plates for Print 5: one for “Four Patches Strip sets A & B. One for Four Patch Frames Strip Set C. One for Replacement Triangles.

Piecing Instructions

Step 1 – Use the diagram on page 9 to make your strip sets. Position two strips right sides together and align the long edges. Stitch with your best ¼” seam. Press the seam toward Print 5 in all strip sets.

Strip Set A – Prints 5 & 6
Strip Set B – Prints 5 & 7

Step 2 – Layer Strip Set A on top of Strip Set B, right sides together, making sure that the Print 5 fabrics are positioned as shown in the diagram. Nest the seams well. Sub-cut along the strip at 2¼” increments until you have 16 sub-cut pieces.

Step 2 – Layer and Sub-Cut at 2 1/4″ increments

Step 3 – Sub-cut Strip Set C. Do not layer it with anything, just make cuts every 2” until you have 16 pieces.

Step 4 – Stitch down the long side of the layered A/B pairs. Consistently feed Print 5 under the machine first. This will make for a nicer alignment in the center.

Remove 2 or 3 striches

Step 5 – Press the unit so that the seams spin. To spin the seam, lay the sewn seam east to west on the mat, remove the stitches in the seams on both sides that run north to south. Press so that all seams go in the same direction.

Swirl and press.

Step 6 – Trim. Locate the circle for the 3” finished size on your Four Patch Square Up® tool and position the circle over the sewn seam intersection in the center of your four patch unit, and the dashed lines with your seams. Trim the first two sides.

Right Handed Trimming

Step 7 – Rotate the unit 180 degrees . Realign the 3” Finished Size circle with the center and the dashed lines with your seams. Also make sure that the outside trimmed edge of the unit is aligned with the 3½” cleanup lines. Trim the final two sides. Repeat steps 6 and 7 for the remaining units.

Second Trim

Step 8 – Stitch a 2”x 3½” Print 5 rectangle to the side of each four patch as shown. Press toward the Print 5 rectangle.

Step 8

Step 9 – Stitch a Strip Set C piece onto the pieced unit as shown. Press toward the C piece.

Step 9

Chevrons

Step 10 – Layer two 2”x 5” Print 11 rectangles wrong sides together. Carefully align the edges. On your Corner Pop® tool, find the 1½” Cut Away Corners line. Position the 1½” Cut Away lines of the tool over the corner of the rectangles as shown. Trim. Repeat for the remaining rectangles.

Step 10

Step 11 – Center the long edge of one 2¾” Print 6 replacement triangle on the trimmed corner of each rectangle.

Step 11, part 1

Step 11 Cont.: Stitch with the rectangle on top using an accurate ¼” seam. Separate the rectangles into two piles as shown in the diagram. Press the seams of the pile on the left toward the triangle and the seams of the right pile toward the rectangle.

Step 12 – Position the 1½” Corner Trim Down line of the tool over the sewn seam. Align the diagonal guideline with the seam and the edges of the unit with the edge and lines on the tool. Trim the corner. Repeat for all the rectangles.

Step 12

Step 13 – Separate the rectangles into two piles as shown. Turn the right pile (with the replacement triangle slanting from upper right to lower left) wrong side up.

Step 14 – Cut. Use the Corner Pop® tool and the 1½” Cut Away Corners line and cut away the corner opposite Print 6. Make sure that you have the piece positioned how it is in the diagram so that you are cutting off the correct corner to make the chevron. You will cut with 16 units right side up and 16 units right side down. Cut the corner off once you have confirmed that you are cutting in the correct spot.

Step 15 – Repeat steps 11 &12 for the cut away corner using the Print 5 replacement triangles.

Step 15

Step 16 – Lay out the pieced rectangles as shown. Position two of them right sides together leaving them in the same orientation and stitch down the long side. Press the seam open.

Step 16

Block Construction

Step 17 – Lay out the framed four patches, chevrons, and center square so that it looks like the diagram.

Step 17

Step 18 – Stitch the units together into rows and then stitch the rows together to create the block. Press as shown in the diagram. You will have 4 blocks when you are done. Label them Block G.

Block G Winged Nine Patch

Congratulations, not only did you expand your knowledge of the Four Patch Square Up tool by making Four Patches with Frames, you also learned to use the Corner Pop tool by making Chevron units!

I’m Repeating Myself Again – OBW #80

What is a One Block Wonder (OBW)? I bought Maxine Rosenthal’s book “One Block Wonders” in 2006 and was totally awestruck! So much so, that I have made 79 hexagon OBW’s since. Whether you are making hexagons or octagons your are creating kaleidoscope blocks – each one unique by using one fabric, one shape for one of kind quilts! With hexagon OBW’s you cut 6 identical repeats and with octagon OBW’s you cut 8 identical repeats.

Octagons are used in the cover photo.

In 2007 I bought Alexander Henry’s fabulous fabric “Lion Eyes”. I always buy at least 6 yards. This time I had 12 yards in my stash.

I made my 27th hexagon OBW and named it “Just Lion Around” It was included in Maxine Rosenthal’s 4th book One Block Wonders of World.

Just Lion Around 2007, OBW #27

I made my first OBW in 2006. That year I made 16 OBW’s. It only took me 14 years to finally make my first octagon One Block Wonder!

Cutting the Repeats: I cut my 8 identical repeats and aligned them just as I would for a hexagon OBW. Now it is time to cut octagon and corner triangle strips. You can make octagon OBW’s in any size. Following Maxine’s suggestion I cut my octagon strips 4″ wide. Maxine said to cut the strips for the corner triangles 2 3/4″ wide. I am a Studio 180 Design Certified Instructor. You may be able to take the girl out of the studio…but you will never take the studio (180) out of the girl!

Instead of 2 3/4″ strips, I cut my corner triangle strips 3″ wide, that would give me a little more to trim off the completed octagon blocks. After I aligned and trimmed one long edge of the repeats, I re-measure the width of my repeat to verify how may strips I can cut. My trimmed, aligned repeat measured 23″. For every two strips used to make octagons, cut one strip for the “Sensational Squares” (corner triangles). If I cut four 4″ strips and two 3″ strips it equals 22″. Now I know I have enough fabric in my repeat without cutting myself short.

First cut

As I said earlier: You may be able to take the girl out of the studio…but you will never take the studio (180) out of the girl! I am using Studio 180 Design’s Wedge Star Tool to cut my wedges for the octagon blocks.

The beauty of the Wedge Star tool is you can make octagons in sizes 3″ to 24″.

I found it easier to cut both left and right wedges by placing the octagon strip vertically on my cutting table and pull the strip toward me as I cut. The Wedge Star tool instructions show how to cut the units horizontally also:

Continue cutting your wedge units. I got 23 wedges per strip.

From the 3″ strips cut your 3″ squares using your Tucker Trimmer I.

Cut you squares diagonally once and set aside.

Because hexagons are made with equilateral triangles you have 3 choices as how to design your block. With Octagons you only have one choice, the narrow end of the wedge is always the center.

Align two wedges and chain stitch the four pair.

As with hexagons, press all seams open. I love my Strip Sticks for that.

Remove “dog ear” and sliver trim the wedge pair. Righties orient the wedge pair so the 90 degree corner is in the upper right (lefties orient the wedge pair so the 90 degree corner is in the upper left). Align the common diagonal line on the Tucker Trimmer with the seam and slide it toward the corner just until the sides of the tool touch the very edge of the wedge pair and trim. Note there may be just a few whiskers trimmed here. This is called Trueing up your 90 degree angles and will create a much more square unit.

Match up two wedge pairs, stitch them together and press seams open.

Find the center of the two wedge halves by placing a pin where the two seams meet in both units and align the halves. Pin close to both sides of the first pin, then remove the pin in the center. This will help to center you octagon wedge halves.

Stitch your wedge halves together.

Press your seams open.

I placed my octagons on the design wall as I made them. This helped me to see what I had.

Here I am looking at life through rose colored glasses. again Time to sort the octagons. Looking at the octagons through red plastic helps me to sort the octagons by value. If you didn’t know, I have been battling breast cancer. I am responding well to treatment, but as my hair grows back, I’m noting a resemblance to the Old Man Dancing for the Six Flags commercials.

Sorting the octagons by predominate color or value was more difficult than I thought it would be. I think because the octagons don’t nest with each other as the hexagons do, you don’t get the same flow and movement. I’m saying this because after I added the corner triangles i wasn’t as happy with the design. Take your designing!

Tip: This is most important tip! Place a flower pin in the top wedge of each octagon! By doing this you will be able to easily orient the octagons as you remove and place them back on the design wall. It will keep your brains from falling out!

Adding the “Sensational Squares” (corner triangles).

One set of corner triangles is laid out as shown above making a kaleidoscope square.

Those squares will fit into the space between 4 octagons.

When you step back from the design wall, the square will appear to be gone as the 4 octagons blend together.

I worked with one row at time, deciding which set of corners to add. Remove one octagon at a time and stitch the triangle to the appropriate octagon wedge. In affect, you will be adding corners that effect two rows at a time. In the end, each octagon will have a different triangle on each corner.

Center the octagon wedge over the corner triangle and stitch. Press toward the corner triangle. Remember Deb Tucker’s tip when pressing: “whatever you are pressing toward, always goes on top”!

Above shows the corner triangles added to the inner octagons.

Once the inner octagons have the corners added, continue adding the final corner triangles to the outside edges of the octagons.

Trimming the Octagon Blocks: The octagon units need to be squared up to 6 1/2″.

If you don’t know the beauty of using the Tucker Trimmer you will love this. The Tucker Trimmer is marked with a “Common Diagonal line and Size Lines to help you perfectly center each unit or block for trimming. For righties the Common diagonal line is placed on the center seam going from the bottom left to the upper right. The 6 1/2″ size line is positioned from the upper left to the lower right going through the center of the block. The size line and common diagonal line should intersect in the center of the block centering it perfectly for squaring up. Trim up the right side and across the top. Rotate the block place the 6” clean up lines of the Tucker Trimmer on just trimmed lines of the block. Trim up the right side and across the top.

When all the octagons are trimmed it’s time to stitch your blocks into rows and then join your rows to complete your quilt. My layout was 9 X 10 = 90 – 6″ finished blocks measuring 57″ X 63″ unquilted. I learned a lot in this process. I think my layout would have been more satisfying if I had left it more random. I was trying to create an oval shape with the lighter blocks in the center. But there wasn’t enough contrast between the medium and light blocks. I’ve always been a little contrast challenged.

Check out my post Hallucinating With My Spirit Animal for more ways to use your Wedge Star Tool.

Hallucinations

The Spiderweb Quilt Below can also be made using the Wedge Star tool.

Spiderweb Quilt

Journeys Month 3 – Flying Geese

Welcome to Stitchin Heaven’s Journeys BOM Month 3. This month you will be learning to make flying geese the Deb Tucker way, using your Wing Clipper I. My helper this month is Deb Tucker herself! As always use your best cutting, stitching and pressing skills. We will be using prints 1, 2 & 5. Carefully cut your starter squares and let’s go!

Prints 1, 2 & 5

Piecing Instructions Flying Geese Construction

Step 1 – Mark Squares. Begin with one large Print 1 square and two Print 2 and two Print 5 small squares. On the wrong side of each small square, mark two stitching lines ¼” on either side of the center diagonal. I like to use my Quilter’s Magic Wand™ for this task.

Step 1

Step 2 – Position the two Print 2 small squares in opposite diagonal corners of the large square, right sides together. Nudge the small squares in toward the center a few threads from the edge of the large square and align the drawn lines.

Nudge the small squares toward the center of the large square.
Step 2

Step 3 – Stitch on the two marked lines, then cut between the stitching lines along the center diagonal of the squares. Press your seams toward the small triangles.

Tip: Stitch just inside of the drawn lines. This will give you more to trim later.
Step 3
Step 3 Cont.

Step 4 – Position two Print 5 small squares, one in each corner of your heart shaped units. Nudge these squares a few threads in from the edge of the large triangle.

Step 4

Step 5 – Stitch along the two marked lines.

Step 5

Step 6 – Cut between the stitched lines along the center diagonal of the small squares and press toward the small triangle.

Step 6
Step 6

Step 7 – Position your Wing Clipper® I tool over your unit, aligning the correct diagonal guidelines of the ruler with the seams of your unit and trim two sides. Rotate the unit 180° and align the 3½”x 6½” horizontal and vertical guide lines with the edges of the unit. Align the “X” on the Wing Clipper® I with the seam intersection of your unit and trim again. Repeat for the remaining units. You will end up with 24 geese that have print 2 on the left, label these as Unit E, and 24 geese that have print 2 on the right, label these as Unit F.

First Trim
Second Trim
4 Flying Geese

Congratulations! You have now learned to make flying geese using the Wing Clipper I.

It’s December! Time for Christmas Tree Quilts

I love Christmas & I love Christmas Tree Quilts! Over the years I have made several and decided to share some with you. Studio 180 Design tools gives you several ways to easily make Christmas Trees.

I Believe

I made this 7 years ago for my Granddaughter Samantha. I Believe uses the V Block tool. Below is the supply list:

Deck the Halls

I made Deck the Halls for Northcott Fabrics in 2019. It is made with Tucker Trimmer I & Wing Clipper I. Below is the supply list:

Split Rects Christmas Tree

The Split Rects Christmas Tree wall hanging is made with the Split Rects tool. The supply list is below:

Wing Clipper Wall Hanging

The Wing Clipper wall hanging is made with 4 Flying Geese using the Wing Clipper I. The supply list is below:

Kermits Christmas Tree

This Skinny Christmas Tree was made using all 10 sizes the Wing Clipper I makes. Supply List is below:

Happy Holidays everyone!

Journeys Month 2 – Triangle Units

Welcome to Stitchin Heaven’s Journeys Month 2. My helper for Month 2 is Amy Lemke, a talented graphic artist for Studio 180 Design. This month you are going to learn to make Half Square Triangles (HSTs) and Combination Units with your Tucker Trimmer I with Prints 1, 2, 5, 10, & 11. Label your fabrics and use your best cutting skills when cutting your starter squares.

Prints 1, 2, 5, 10 & 11.

Tip: I use plain paper plates and write on them what it is I have cut out. For instance, if you are new to using a Tucker Trimmer, I would label 6 paper plates: one for each print. Using a pen or pencil label the first plate “Print 1, Combination Units (unit D)”, and so on.

Half Square Triangle Construction

Note: For more information and left handed cutting and trimming directions, refer to the instruction that came with your Tucker Trimmer.

Prints 5, 10, & 11.

Step 1 – Mark two stitching lines ¼” on either side of the center diagonal. Draw the lines on the wrong side of all the 7” squares from Print 11. I like to use my Quilter’s Magic Wand™ for this task.

Mark using a Magic Wand.

Step 2 – Layer the 7” Print 11 squares right sides together with the 7” squares from Prints 5 and 10. Stitch on the lines, then cut down the middle. Press away from Print 11 or open.

Layer.

Stitch and cut apart.

Press.

Step 3 – Trim the units to 6½” using the Tucker Trimmer® I. Align the 6½” Sizing Diagonal with the seam and trim the first two sides.

First Trim

Step 4 – Rotate the unit 180 degrees and align the 6½” Sizing Diagonal with the seam as well as the 6½” cleanup lines with the outside edge. Trim the remaining two sides to create your precise Half Square Triangle units. Label the units made with Print 5 Unit C, and label the units with Print 10 Unit B.

Second Trim

Make 8 each from prints 10 & 11 and prints 5 & 11.

Combination Unit Construction

Prints 1, 2 & 11

Step 5 – Repeat steps 1 and 2 using the 7½” squares from Print 1 and Print 2 to make 4 Half Square Triangles. Press away from Print 2 or open. Do not trim!

Starter Squares

Step 6 – Mark two stitching lines ¼” on either side of the center diagonal line of the pieced Half Square Triangles.

Mark back of HSTs

Step 7 – Position the pieced squares right sides together with the 7½” Print 11 squares. Note that the edges are not intended to match. Stitch on the lines, then cut down the middle. Press toward the large triangle.

Stitch, cut apart & press.

Step 8 – Trim the units to 6½” using the Tucker Timmer® I. Align the 6½” Sizing Diagonal with the long seam and the Common Diagonal with the short seam. Trim the first two sides.

First Trim

Step 9 – Rotate the unit 180o and align the Sizing and Common Diagonals with the seam as well as the 6½” cleanup lines with the trimmed edge. Trim the remaining two sides to create your precise Combination units. Label them Unit D.

Second Trim

Congratulations, you have learned to make half square triangles and combination units using your Tucker Trimmer I.

Getting Ready for Journey BOM Month 1

Journey’s Month 1 will start shipping September 29th. I will post the Month 1 blog on October 6th, 2020. In the meantime if you haven’t used your Four Patch Square Up tool yet watch Deb Tucker’s Four Patch Square Up Video:

Quilters – Rev your Sewing Machines!

Are you Ready for Journey’s BOM? We are getting close. I am shooting for Journey’s Month 1 to be posted September 29th, IF everything is in place by then. I will keep you posted (get it, LOL). The photo above is the Journey’s I made to test the pattern last Spring. It was not made with the beautiful fabrics you are getting from Stitchin Heaven & Jason Yenter.

A Prickly Situation – OBW #76

Yes, I’m at it again! Actually I’ve had this panel cut out since last Fall. I love One Block Wonders (OBWs). Sometimes I add cubes to create design interest or just for fun. It occurred to me that Studio 180 Design has a new Star 60 tool.

You can use this tool to cut equilateral triangles easily, along with 60 degree diamonds and side triangles in 17 sizes to create a multitude of 60 degree designs.

I played with Star 60 and created kaleidoscope stars and this 48″ star. Light Bulb moment!!!! Instead of inserting cubes in my OBW, why not a star?

I usually have left over triangles when designing my OBW’s. I had equilateral triangles cut that had a dark edge that was larger than a 1/4″. I was thought it might not make a pretty hexie. These triangles had been cut from 3 3/4″ strips. I laid my Star 60 tool on the triangles and discovered I could cut 3″ diamonds from it. This allowed me to use these left over triangles in a different way.

Way cool! Now I needed side triangles for the star points. I checked the size chart for 3″ diamonds and cut the appropriate size strip,

I cut the side triangles for my diamond star points.

Lay out your units. Stitch the first side triangle to the diamond and press toward the diamond.

Stitch the opposite side triangle, press toward the side triangle. LOOK what you have! An equilateral triangle.

Stitch 3 triangles together, and then the other 3 together, press seams open as you would a regular hexagon.

I began designing around my panel. I had great fabric “Canvas” from Northcott. This rich colors worked so well with panel.

I have stitched my hexie’s into four sections to add to my panel. My hexies were cut from 3 3/4″ strips, which means they will finish as a 6″ hexagon. For 6″ hexies to fit evenly across the width this panel should measure 18″ or 24″ wide. This panel is less than 24″ wide.

I did not want to trim my panel to 18″ so I added enough fabric to the panel to bring it up to 24″ wide and would be evenly divisible by 6″. Now to hide the strip.

There are 9 & a 1/2 Star 60 hexie’s in this quilt. The Star 60 tool also made it easy to cut half & whole hexagons. I’ve just barley scratched the surface of cool 60 degree design’s that can be added to a One Block Wonder. You can download my hints for using panels in a OBW below:

I Will Be Your Guide On This Journey

Stitchin Heaven Quilt Shop is excited to announce a new collaboration of a unique BOM program from Deb Tucker (Studio 180 Design), NYT and USA Today best-selling author Marie Bostwick (Between Heaven and Texas, Hope on the Inside, and the Cobbled Court Quilt Series, including A Single Thread), Deb Luttrell (Stitchin’ Heaven), and Jason Yenter (In the Beginning Fabrics). In this 12-month program you will take your own Journeys through an exclusive novella written by Marie Bostwick. Each month you will receive a chapter from the book which is exclusive to this program. It is a page-turning tale of love, loss, and new beginnings for PJ Lloyd, an adventurous young woman who defies her family and risks her future to make a difference after the attack that plunged America into the second World War.

I will be your guide on this “Journey”. Every month I will post a tutorial showing you how to use the tools required for this beautiful quilt and answering your questions.

Throughout the Journeys BOM you will be on your own journey to learn how to use 8 of the tools from Studio 180 Design. Tools include: V Block, Corner Pop, Four-patch Square Up, Tucker Trimmer, Rapid Fire Lemoyne Star, Square Squared, Wing Clipper, Corner Beam. The final quilt measures 102″ x 102″. A beautiful collection of fabrics have been designed by Jason Yenter of In The Beginning Fabrics, that will make this project an heirloom favorite.

I tested the pattern with fabrics from Deb Tucker’s stash. It is truly a beautiful quilt I can’t wait for you to make your own! The Journey’s BOM program is due to start in September 2020. We will be sure to keep you up to date and informed on all the details.

A conversation with Deb Luttrell, Deb Tucker & Marie Bostwick

Two of a Kind

I’m sitting here in Tuckerville, watching TV, looking at my ceiling. I pin orphan blocks on my drop ceiling.

Two of a Kind

These two blocks are made from the same fabric and units. They both have a Square Squared for the block center, 4 V Block units for the star points and 4 Shaded Four Patch Units (with the Tucker Trimmer I) in the block corners. The top block has the Shaded Four Patch unit small square facing out, while the bottom block has the Shaded Four Patch unit small square facing in. Two very different looks from the same block.

As I stared at these blocks on the ceiling I wondered what the secondary design would be if I put them in a quilt. Time to break out EQ8!

I used shades of purple and lavender because I thought my sister may like it. This is pretty cool. EQ8 is fun to use and brings quilt designs to life. Time to break out my Studio 180 Design tools get busy!